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Featured Spinal Cord Injury Articles

Featured Articles

The Teen Actor Who’s Breaking Barriers On TV

Published: September 21, 2016 | Spinal Cord Injury:

micah-fowler-as-jj-dimeo-on-speechlessMicah Fowler, the star of Speechless, is just your average almost-famous high school senior with a disability rights mission.

Shortly before his high school prom, actor Micah Fowler found out ABC had picked up Speechless, the sitcom in which he stars as a nonverbal teen in a family of five. Weeks later, the 18-year-old New Jersey native moved to Los Angeles with his mother to start shooting and he’s had to make some personal sacrifices for this gig: He is missing much of his sled hockey season and much of his senior year (though he still plans to graduate with his class in the spring); plus, the somewhat social media–averse teen has joined both Twitter and Instagram to promote the show. Continue Reading »

Mason Ellis – Explaining Tenodesis

Published: August 16, 2016 | Spinal Cord Injury: , , ,

This is a video of Mason Ellis explaining Tenodesis (movement of the wrist to move fingers). Mason is a C5, C6, C7 Complete Quadriplegic (Paralysis of all four limbs) with little tricep function.

Subscribe to Mason Ellis on YouTube and check out his other great videos.

Continue Reading »

Just Don’t Dive! Go in Feet First to Avoid Spinal Cord Injuries

Published: August 1, 2016

Diving into a pool or lake during summer activities may land you in a wheelchair for the rest of your life; over 800 people per year suffer a spinal cord injury from diving in head first. These injuries are preventable—just remember to always go in feet first when entering pools, ponds, lakes, and the ocean.

Perhaps you didn’t see a sign warning you of danger. Maybe you didn’t know that the “No Diving” sign meant the water was too shallow. Or you thought the water was deep enough because it had been the last time you dove in. But 1000 other people thought that too and ended up with broken necks, paralysis, or even worse, didn’t make it through the injury. Continue Reading »

Craig Hospital: Redefining Scuba Diving

Published: July 2, 2016 | Spinal Cord Injury:

Elizabeth “EB” Forst always felt comfortable in the water. Continue Reading »

Woman With Quadriplegia Urges Hollywood To Be More Hopeful

Published: June 25, 2016 | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

This story contains spoilers for the film “Me Before You.”

MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — A Wisconsin woman is getting a lot of attention for a blog post she wrote criticizing Hollywood’s portrayal of people who are paralyzed. Continue Reading »

The Apple Watch Will Soon Track Fitness for Wheelchair Users

Published: June 13, 2016

apple-wheelchair-users-appFitness trackers routinely measure physical activity such as running and cycling and encourage people to stand up and walk around throughout the day. But if you’re in a wheelchair, you’re out of luck.

Apple wants to change that with an upcoming Apple Watch feature announced Monday. Instead of standing breaks, people in wheelchairs will be prompted to wheel or spin their chairs around regularly. Apple will also start tracking distance, speed and calories burned during wheelchair use, just as it does for walking or running. Continue Reading »

Quadriplegic bride marries her Iron Man

Published: June 7, 2016 | Spinal Cord Injury: , ,

Tracy Todd Wedding 1Tracy Todd recently married the man of her dreams in a beautiful ceremony witnessed by friends, family and members of her community.

Tracy Todd’s life changed forever 18 years ago when an accident left her paralysed from the neck down. Tracy was but a newlywed with a 10-month old baby boy. Following the horrific accident Tracy was left to pick up the pieces and start afresh.

In a no-holds barred interview with us, Tracy revealed how she not only lost the use of her upper and lower limbs, but with unflinching honesty, also told us that she lost her career, her independence and her husband (they got divorced a year after the accident). Continue Reading »

Indiana woman with quadriplegia embraces joys, challenges of motherhood

Published: April 29, 2016 | Spinal Cord Injury:

Joni feeds ZacharyAs each of her children grew inside her womb, Joni Vanderwoude felt nothing — not the fluttering first kicks in the beginning, not the bulging of her belly as it stretched to the size of a basketball, not the piercing contractions of labor that usually signal it’s time.

A car accident 16 years ago left Vanderwoude paralyzed from the neck down, unable to walk, cough or even scratch her own nose without someone to do what her own body could not. But Vanderwoude, of DeMotte, Ind., has never dwelled on the limitations of being a person with quadriplegia. Two years after the accident, she married her high school sweetheart. Four years after that they began trying to have children — a medical possibility for most women who suffer from spinal cord injury, despite what people might assume. Continue Reading »

Researchers discover role of protein in neuron sprouting

Published: April 19, 2016

Kentucky Spinal Cord Injury Research CenterRole of adaptor protein CD2AP in neuron sprouting discovered by UofL researchers could lead to therapies for Alzheimer’s disease, stroke recovery and spinal cord injury

University of Louisville researchers have discovered that a protein previously known for its role in kidney function also plays a significant role in the nervous system. In an article featured in the April 13 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience, they show that the adaptor protein CD2AP is a key player in a type of neural growth known as collateral sprouting. Continue Reading »

Quadriplegic man Ian Burkhart moves fingers, hand and wrist thanks to tiny computer chip in brain

Published: April 13, 2016 | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

ian-burkhart-paralysed-moves-wrist-handA quadriplegic man has been able to move his fingers, hand and wrist after having a tiny computer chip implanted in his brain. The neuroprosthetic device, which is smaller than a pea, translates neural activity in order to activate paralysed muscles.

Ian Burkhart, a 24-year-old from Ohio, was paralysed following a diving accident six years ago. The injury to his spinal cord left him unable to move his arms and legs. Paralysis is caused by a disruption of signal pathways between the brain and muscles. Previously, researchers have been able to restore movement in humans with the aid of robotics or assistive devices, but movements without these aids has only ever been achieved in non-human primates. Continue Reading »