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Spinal Cord Injury Information

Information on Spinal Cord Injury Research, Treatments, Medicines and Quality of Life

Things you might not know about Autonomic Dysreflexia

Published: July 17, 2016

blood pressure autonomic dysreflexiaThe body is a series of checks and balances. This is true of muscles that push and countering muscles that pull. It is also true of the nervous system that operates in a balancing type of process. Individuals with higher level spinal cord injury can develop a complication called Autonomic Dysreflexia (AD). This is a condition where the sympathetic nervous system is left unchecked by the parasympathetic nervous system.

There is a bundle of nerves at the Thoracic vertebrae number six (T6) level that is a major junction where nerves come close together in the spinal cord. Individuals with spinal cord injury above this level have a disruption in the nerve segment. For these individuals, stimulation of the body at or below T6 can send confusing messages to the brain as the message will create a huge discharge of the sympathetic nervous system using all of the blood flow in the abdomen without the counter control of the parasympathetic nervous system to contain it. Blood pressure rises to extremely high proportions. Continue Reading »

Mower Attachment for disabled people in wheelchairs

Published: July 7, 2016 | Spinal Cord Injury:

A man’s friend wanted to be able to mow the yard after his legs have lost function from M.S. so he built him this. Continue Reading »

Improving cell transplantation after spinal cord injury: When, where and how?

Published: May 31, 2016

Spinal cord injuries are mostly caused by trauma, often incurred in road traffic or sporting incidents, often with devastating and irreversible consequences, and unfortunately having a relatively high prevalence (250,000 patients in the USA; 80% of cases are male). One currently explored approach to restoring function after spinal cord injury is the transplantation of olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) into the damaged area. The hope is that these will encourage the repair of damaged neurons, but does it work? And if so, how can it be optimized? Continue Reading »

Stem Cell Therapy for Spinal Cord Injury: A Status Report

Published: May 6, 2016

Stem Cell Therapy for Spinal Cord InjuryNew Hope for Paralyzed Patients?

If you have a spinal cord injury, recent reports on stem cell therapy look like a dream come true. Like wire spliced into a severed cable, stem cells could restore communication between your body and your brain.

After endless numbness, you might once again feel the grass between your toes or the caress of a lover. After an eternity of motionlessness, you might rise from your chair or hoist a glass of wine to your lips. Continue Reading »

Help shape the future of SCI treatment

Published: April 20, 2016

Pathway-LogoThe path to recovery from spinal cord injury (SCI) is full of challenges.

If you’re interested in taking part in research to evaluate investigational therapies for SCI, you may be interested in a clinical research study called Pathway that is evaluating the potential of neural stem cells to treat cervical spinal cord injury (cSCI).

What is the Pathway study?

The purpose of the Pathway Study is to evaluate the safety and potential benefit of neural stem cell transplantation for people with cSCI. If you are eligible for the study and if you choose to participate, your participation will last approximately 12 months. Continue Reading »

The Use of Cell Transplantation in Spinal Cord Injuries

Published: April 14, 2016

stem-cells-for-spinal-cord-injuryOverview
The spinal cord is often called as a delicate tissue, which is secured inside very hard vertebrae of spinal column. The spinal cord and brain is seen forming the central nervous system of our body. The spinal cord is basically made up of millions of nerve cells, which carry a number of signals to our brain and out over the other parts of human body. Unfortunately with issues like injuries with accident and with age or other ailments the spinal cord can end up getting injured. There are certain spinal cord injuries, which can be fixed with the help of treatment options like cell transplantation. Now, let us dig in deep into this treatment option in the following paragraphs: Continue Reading »

5 Things to Know About Spinal Cord Injury

Published: April 8, 2016

Human Spine x-rayA spinal cord injury can be a life-altering event for the person who sustains it as well as for their loved ones. Given the potential for lifelong disability, it is vital that the facts about these kinds of injuries be clearly understood. Here are five key things to know about them: Continue Reading »

Autonomic Dysreflexia is a life threatening condition

Published: April 5, 2016

autonomic-dysreflexiaAutonomic Dysreflexia is a life threatening condition that can cause death.

The most common causes of Autonomic Dysreflexia are bladder and bowel distension.

Signs and Symptoms: Raised BP, bradycardia, pounding headache, flushing, sweating or blotching above level of injury; pale, cold, goosebumps below level of injury. Continue Reading »

Measuring severity of spinal cord injuries

Published: March 22, 2016

spinal cord injuryInjuries to the spinal cord partially or completely disrupt the neural pathways between the brain and the limbs. The consequences for the representation of the affected limbs in the brain can be drastic. Researchers have now measured how severely this representation is affected.

A strange sensation, but familiar to anyone who has ever been given local anaesthesia and watched while a doctor operated on their leg or arm: in that moment, your own body part seems foreign, as if it doesn’t belong to your body. One reason for this is that the brain still knows which position the limb occupied before the local anaesthetic took effect. As soon as it wears off, the spooky sensation disappears. Continue Reading »

Spasticity : two potential therapeutic avenues

Published: March 17, 2016

neurone_webFollowing spinal cord injury, most patients experience an exaggeration of muscle tone called spasticity, which frequently leads to physical disability.

A team at the Institut de Neurosciences de la Timone (CNRS/Aix-Marseille Université) has just identified one of the molecular mechanisms responsible for this phenomenon. It has also proposed two therapeutic solutions that have proved conclusive in animals, one of which will be tested during phase II clinical trials as early as this year. This work, published in Nature Medicineon 14 March 2016, thus opens new therapeutic avenues to reduce this physical disability.

Twelve million people throughout the world suffer from a motor disorder called spasticity. Continue Reading »