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Spinal Cord Injury Information

Information on Spinal Cord Injury Research, Treatments, Medicines and Quality of Life

Help shape the future of SCI treatment

Published: April 20, 2016

Pathway-LogoThe path to recovery from spinal cord injury (SCI) is full of challenges.

If you’re interested in taking part in research to evaluate investigational therapies for SCI, you may be interested in a clinical research study called Pathway that is evaluating the potential of neural stem cells to treat cervical spinal cord injury (cSCI).

What is the Pathway study?

The purpose of the Pathway Study is to evaluate the safety and potential benefit of neural stem cell transplantation for people with cSCI. If you are eligible for the study and if you choose to participate, your participation will last approximately 12 months. Continue Reading »

The Use of Cell Transplantation in Spinal Cord Injuries

Published: April 14, 2016

stem-cells-for-spinal-cord-injuryOverview
The spinal cord is often called as a delicate tissue, which is secured inside very hard vertebrae of spinal column. The spinal cord and brain is seen forming the central nervous system of our body. The spinal cord is basically made up of millions of nerve cells, which carry a number of signals to our brain and out over the other parts of human body. Unfortunately with issues like injuries with accident and with age or other ailments the spinal cord can end up getting injured. There are certain spinal cord injuries, which can be fixed with the help of treatment options like cell transplantation. Now, let us dig in deep into this treatment option in the following paragraphs: Continue Reading »

5 Things to Know About Spinal Cord Injury

Published: April 8, 2016

Human Spine x-rayA spinal cord injury can be a life-altering event for the person who sustains it as well as for their loved ones. Given the potential for lifelong disability, it is vital that the facts about these kinds of injuries be clearly understood. Here are five key things to know about them: Continue Reading »

Autonomic Dysreflexia is a life threatening condition

Published: April 5, 2016

autonomic-dysreflexiaAutonomic Dysreflexia is a life threatening condition that can cause death.

The most common causes of Autonomic Dysreflexia are bladder and bowel distension.

Signs and Symptoms: Raised BP, bradycardia, pounding headache, flushing, sweating or blotching above level of injury; pale, cold, goosebumps below level of injury. Continue Reading »

Measuring severity of spinal cord injuries

Published: March 22, 2016

spinal cord injuryInjuries to the spinal cord partially or completely disrupt the neural pathways between the brain and the limbs. The consequences for the representation of the affected limbs in the brain can be drastic. Researchers have now measured how severely this representation is affected.

A strange sensation, but familiar to anyone who has ever been given local anaesthesia and watched while a doctor operated on their leg or arm: in that moment, your own body part seems foreign, as if it doesn’t belong to your body. One reason for this is that the brain still knows which position the limb occupied before the local anaesthetic took effect. As soon as it wears off, the spooky sensation disappears. Continue Reading »

Spasticity : two potential therapeutic avenues

Published: March 17, 2016

neurone_webFollowing spinal cord injury, most patients experience an exaggeration of muscle tone called spasticity, which frequently leads to physical disability.

A team at the Institut de Neurosciences de la Timone (CNRS/Aix-Marseille Université) has just identified one of the molecular mechanisms responsible for this phenomenon. It has also proposed two therapeutic solutions that have proved conclusive in animals, one of which will be tested during phase II clinical trials as early as this year. This work, published in Nature Medicineon 14 March 2016, thus opens new therapeutic avenues to reduce this physical disability.

Twelve million people throughout the world suffer from a motor disorder called spasticity. Continue Reading »

Autonomic hyperreflexia after spinal cord injury managed successfully with intravenous lidocaine: a case report

Published: March 15, 2016

Abstract

Background
Some paraplegic patients may wish undergo some surgical procedures, like urological procedures, without anesthesia. However, these patients can develop autonomic hyperreflexia if cystoscopy is performed without anesthesia.

Case presentation
We present a case of severe autonomic hyperreflexia in a 44-year-old male with spinal cord injury at the level of T4 during urologic procedure under sedation and analgesia successfully treated with intravenous lidocaine. Continue Reading »

Bioelectronic devices to improve quality of life after SCI

Published: March 3, 2016

Bioelectronic devices that record and stimulate the brain, spinal cord or peripheral nerves have potential to dramatically improve function after injury or disease. Continue Reading »

Early Rehab May Help Spinal Cord Injury Patients

Published: February 19, 2016

Early Rehab May Help Spinal Cord Injury Patients(HealthDay News) — Beginning rehabilitation soon after a spinal cord injury seems to lead to improvements in functioning for patients, according to a new study.

Researchers analyzed data from nearly 4,000 people in the United States who suffered a spinal cord injury between 2000 and 2014. The patients’ average age was about 41 and the average time to start rehabilitation was 19 days.

Early rehabilitation was associated with better physical functioning when patients left the hospital and during the following year. Continue Reading »

Long-term change in respiratory function following spinal cord injury

Published: January 12, 2016

Study design: Retrospective study.

Objectives: To model the effect of time since injury on longitudinal respiratory function measures in spinal cord injured-individuals and to investigate the effect of patient characteristics.

Setting: A total of 173 people who sustained a spinal cord injury between 1966 and April 2013 and who had previously participated in research or who underwent clinically indicated outpatient respiratory function tests at the Austin Hospital in Melbourne, Australia, were included in the study. At least two measurements over time were available for analysis in 59 patients. Continue Reading »

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