SUBSCRIBE: RSS Feed for Spinal Cord Injury Zone Email Updates Follow Spinal Cord Injury Zone on Twitter Spinal Cord Injury Zone on Facebook

Spinal Cord Injury Information

Information on Spinal Cord Injury Research, Treatments, Medicines and Quality of Life

Long-term change in respiratory function following spinal cord injury

Published: January 12, 2016

Study design: Retrospective study.

Objectives: To model the effect of time since injury on longitudinal respiratory function measures in spinal cord injured-individuals and to investigate the effect of patient characteristics.

Setting: A total of 173 people who sustained a spinal cord injury between 1966 and April 2013 and who had previously participated in research or who underwent clinically indicated outpatient respiratory function tests at the Austin Hospital in Melbourne, Australia, were included in the study. At least two measurements over time were available for analysis in 59 patients. Continue Reading »

Breaking Bad: Dozens Of Tourists Suffer Spinal Cord Injuries

Published: January 11, 2016

Too many people are ignoring or simply not understanding the warning signs posted at many public beaches.

Just hours after starting his Hawaii vacation, Todd Duitsman was paralyzed from the neck down.

Duitsman and his family flew from Seattle to Maui in July 2014. They dropped their bags at their condo, got a bite to eat and drove straight to Makena’s Big Beach.

An hour later, Duitsman was body surfing in the shore break. Continue Reading »

Spinal injuries need the most care

Published: December 26, 2015

In many road traffic accidents, the cervical spine (neck region) is injured, says spine surgeon V. Vinod.

When the vertebra is disturbed from its original position, it compresses the spinal cord. This renders the person quadriplegic (complete loss of movement of hands and legs and no sensation below the neck), the surgeon explains. The spinal cord is severed only when a bullet or a knife pierces through it. Continue Reading »

The Year in Review: SCI Research Breakthroughs in 2015

Published: December 21, 2015

spinal cord injury year-in-reviewAs we cross the threshold into 2016, we are one step closer to our goal of finding a cure for paralysis.

Moving full speed ahead towards that goal, Conquer Paralysis Now compiled a brief retrospective. 2015 has been an incredible year for spinal cord injury research, with breakthroughs in a variety of potential treatments, on top of important strides made by individuals with SCI. Take a look at some key milestones from this past year and stay tuned for what’s to come in 2016. Happy New Year! Continue Reading »

Stem cell research for spinal cord injury

Published: December 10, 2015

Spinal cord injury (SCI) involves damage to the area that can cause an impairment of loss of muscle control, movement and sensation.  Currently, patients with injury to the spinal cord are managed with physical therapy, occupation therapy and other rehabilitation methods to cope with the physical changes.

However, stem cell research may present a new approach to the management of this patient group, allowing for a potential improvement in the symptoms of the condition, such as incontinence, muscular control and sexual function. Continue Reading »

Exercise following spinal cord injury: physiology to therapy

Published: December 9, 2015

Spinal cord injuries (SCIs) can have catastrophic effects on individuals resulting in loss of physical abilities and independence. Loss of the ability to perform activities of daily living reduces the quality of life. Furthermore, decreased ability to perform physical activities decreases overall fitness and increases the risk of diseases related to sedentary lifestyle. Activity-based restorative therapies (ABRTs) provide an option to help optimize rehabilitation through the restoration of function and the introduction to physical activities via adapted equipment. Continue Reading »

‘Spinal cord injury patients need family support’

Published: December 3, 2015

CHANDIGARH: Little did Imran Khan know that his life will change forever after an adventure trip he undertook with his friends when he was in an engineering college in Ahmednagar, Maharashtra in 2004. He slipped and the next thing he knew was that he was on a hospital bed, unable to move.

“I fell down due to which I had a spinal cord injury and my nerves were ruptured and spinal cord was fractured,” says Imran, 32, who was 21-year-old at the time of his accident. Continue Reading »

BOOK: Air Travel for Wheelchair Users

Published: November 17, 2015 | Spinal Cord Injury:

Air Travel for Wheelchair Users bookBook Description – Are you a wheelchair user and want to learn about the process of traveling by plane before you take off for the first time? Or perhaps you’re a frequent flier and would just like to learn how to make the process easier for future flights? If you have ever wished that there was a guide to accessible air travel, this is the book for you!

Air Travel for Wheelchair Users is the first book entirely devoted to alleviating any fears that wheelchair users may have when it comes to flying. The entire process, from how to prepare for your upcoming flight to what to do after you land at your destination, is covered in depth. Continue Reading »

Spinal Cord Injuries Lead to a Very Odd (But Serious) Risk

Published: November 14, 2015

Spinal-Cord-Injuries-Lead-to-a-Very-Odd-But-Serious-RiskPeople who get serious spinal cord injuries have to adjust to a lot. That may be why, in the first year after their injuries, they are at serious risk for a potentially fatal condition called autonomic dysreflexia. Autonomic dysreflexia shows that the body can take itself down if its signals are ignored.

Nerves will try to get useful signals through to the brain any way they can. Sometimes this can be a good thing: Nerve cells were once thought to be unable to repair themselves after damage, but now we know they can slowly heal. Continue Reading »

Autonomic dysreflexia in spinal cord injury

Published: October 26, 2015

Autonomic dysreflexia often goes unrecognised in patients with spinal cord injury. Health professionals must be able to recognise when patients are at risk.

A young patient with tetraplegia arrives in the emergency department with a severe headache, dilated pupils, beads of sweat on their forehead, chest pain, bradycardia and a blood pressure of 280/130. What do you think is happening? Recreational drug use? A hypertensive crisis with a renal, endocrine or neurological cause? Is your immediate response to carry out an electrocardiogram and blood tests? In fact, this life-threatening emergency could be caused by something as simple as a full bladder. Continue Reading »