Saturday, November 22nd 2014

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Spinal Cord Injury News

Spinal Cord Injury News Articles

Laboratory Breakthrough Offers Promise for Spinal Cord Injury Patients to Breathe on Their Own Again

Published: November 17, 2014 | Spinal Cord Injury: , ,

Case Western Reserve University School of MedicineCase Western Reserve Researcher Presents Findings that Could Free Patients from Ventilators – Even Years after Injury

Case Western Reserve researchers have developed a procedure that restores function to muscles involved in the control of breathing – even when they have been paralyzed for more than a year. The breakthrough offers hope that one day patients with severe spinal cord injuries will be able to breathe again without the assistance of a ventilator. Continue Reading »

Paralyzed Bride Is Going To Be A Mom With Help Of Surrogate

Published: November 14, 2014 | Spinal Cord Injury:

Paralyzed Bride Is Going To Be A Mom“The accident made me want kids even more.” -Rachelle Friedman

Knightdale, NC — Rachelle Friedman loves to shop. The problem is she doesn’t know if she should buy baby clothes for a boy or a girl.

“Who knows what it’s going to be? I don’t know what I’m leaning toward. There’s good in both. I’d be happy either way,” says Friedman.

Rachelle is expecting her first child with the help of a surrogate. Continue Reading »

Colourful ramps help make businesses more accessible

Published: November 14, 2014

stopgap-community-ramp-projectA few Charlottetown businesses will soon be more accessible thanks to a new program that bridges a gap that kept some customers out in the past.

Spinal Cord Injury P.E.I. is providing the brightly coloured ramps so businesses can become more accessible. The StopGap Community Ramp Project originated in Ontario, but the P.E.I. group brought the idea here. Continue Reading »

Electrical Stimulation Could Improve Bladder Function in People with Spinal Cord Injuries

Published: November 13, 2014

National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and BioengineeringPromising results in rats address major health problem for paralyzed individuals

Newswise — When individuals suffer a spinal cord injury, paralysis is only a part of the major impact on quality of life. Often they also lose bladder control, which frequently causes infections that can lead to kidney damage. To address this problem, scientists used their groundbreaking spinal stimulation technology to enable spinal cord- injured rats to empty their bladders more fully and in a timelier manner. The promising results achieved in rats represent a significant step towards deployment of this novel approach in humans with paraplegia. Continue Reading »

Still Flying High

Published: November 12, 2014 | Spinal Cord Injury:

Joe Stone with fellow bikersQuadriplegic athlete is featured speaker at fundraising event for DREAM Adaptive

Joe Stone doesn’t recall much about the speed flying accident that sent him crashing at 50 miles an hour into the face of Missoula’s Mount Jumbo, putting him in a month-long coma, rendering him quadriplegic and nearly ending his life.

But more impressive than his unlikely survival was his resolve, which gripped him the instant he awoke from the dark maw of unconsciousness, to again venture forth into the mountains. Continue Reading »

Touch-free smartphone lets you text and play games with head gestures

Published: November 12, 2014

Sesame smartphoneIn the Arabian Nights story, whenever Ali Baba shouts “Open Sesame,” the door to the den of the Forty Thieves opens. But for the 10 beta testers of the Sesame phone, uttering that phrase means unlocking their smartphones without the use of their hands. Once the touch-free phone is active, users merely have to move their heads to control the cursor on screen. And yes, they can do anything a smartphone’s capable of, including sending messages and emails, taking/making calls and downloading apps. They can even play games like Angry Birds and Candy Crush by using head gestures. Once they’re done, they simply have to say “Close Sesame” to lock their phones again. Continue Reading »

Three-year-old Evander Conroy stars in a new educational book as part of Spinal Injuries Awareness Week

Published: November 12, 2014

Three-year-old Evander ConroyWHEN three-year-old Evander Conroy starts preschool in the New Year he will enter armed with a children’s storybook — all about him.

Evander, from Hunters Hill, is the subject of a new educational book about spinal cord injuries which was launched as part of Spinal Injury Awareness Week.

It tells the story of Evander sitting in a park with his mum having an ice cream when some superheroes from outer space arrive to take him on a journey of discovery about his unique situation. Continue Reading »

Spinal injuries change people’s lives every day

Published: November 10, 2014 | Spinal Cord Injury:

SCI Awareness Week David ConwayFOR Mackay man David Conway, Spinal Injury Awareness Week is about alerting people to the fact accidents can happen to anyone.

The nationwide awareness week started yesterday.

“Spinal injuries happen every day,” Mr Conway said.

“Becoming paralysed can happen so easily.”

Statistics show one person in Australia will have a spinal cord injury every day.

Mr Conway’s life was changed forever when he was injured in a sporting accident when he was 20. Continue Reading »

Serotonin Causes Spasms in Spinal Cord Injury Patients

Published: November 9, 2014

3d illustration of human spine. Isolated. Contains clipping pathUncontrolled serotonin contributes to spasms in spinal cord injury patients, according to a study published in The Journal of Neuroscience.

Researchers from the University of Copenhagen in Denmark studied the enzyme L-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) in animal models with spinal cord injury and Parkinson’s disease. The enzyme, the researchers believe, contribute to the manufacture of serotonin. The serotonin activates muscle control, and when there is too much serotonin pumped into the system, the motor controls are sent scrambling. Continue Reading »

Striking the cord: Optical control of motor functions

Published: November 7, 2014

Lu-Anikeeva-Fiber-Probe-mitGrad student Chi Lu and colleagues demonstrate a highly flexible polymer probe for triggering spinal-cord neurons with light and simultaneously recording their activity.

MIT researchers have demonstrated a highly flexible neural probe made entirely of polymers that can both optically stimulate and record neural activity in a mouse spinal cord — a step toward developing prosthetic devices that can restore functionality to damaged nerves. Continue Reading »