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Spinal Cord Injury News

Spinal Cord Injury News Articles

‘You can still live life’

Published: April 25, 2016 | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

Drew CumpsonIn a few days, Drew Cumpson will be marking the fifth anniversary of an event that dramatically changed his life — but one which he can’t remember.

If he needs to recall the exact date, he only need look at his left arm. Tattooed there is “05/10/11,” along with the words by which he has tried to live ever since: Keep Fighting, Keep Smiling, Stay Strong.

It is all a reminder of the trip Cumpson took to Peru back in May 2011 where a freak accident left him a quadriplegic. Continue Reading »

Long after his accident, Sam Schmidt takes the wheel again thanks to Project SAM

Published: April 23, 2016 | Spinal Cord Injury: , ,

Sam Schmidt and Simon Pagenaud

Sam Schmidt was paralyzed in a testing accident in 2000. Now he can drive again.

In the late 90s, Sam Schmidt had a promising career as an IndyCar driver, finishing fifth in the championship in 1999 after taking his first win in Las Vegas. In off-season, however, his ascension in the sport was derailed. During testing that following January, an accident at Walt Disney World Speedway in Florida left Schmidt a quadriplegic. Continue Reading »

Researchers discover role of protein in neuron sprouting

Published: April 19, 2016

Kentucky Spinal Cord Injury Research CenterRole of adaptor protein CD2AP in neuron sprouting discovered by UofL researchers could lead to therapies for Alzheimer’s disease, stroke recovery and spinal cord injury

University of Louisville researchers have discovered that a protein previously known for its role in kidney function also plays a significant role in the nervous system. In an article featured in the April 13 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience, they show that the adaptor protein CD2AP is a key player in a type of neural growth known as collateral sprouting. Continue Reading »

Researchers find possible treatment for suppressed immunity from spine injuries

Published: April 18, 2016

abnormal nervous circuity in spinal cord injuryScientists report in Nature Neuroscience they have identified an underlying cause of dangerous immune suppression in people with high level spinal cord injuries and they propose a possible treatment.

In the journal’s April 18 online edition, researchers at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center and Wexner Medical Center at The Ohio State University write that spinal cord injuries higher than thoracic level 5 (T5) cause autonomic nervous system circuitry to develop a highly adaptable state of plasticity. The autonomic nervous system controls bodily functions that are not consciously directed – like breathing, heartbeat, digestion and immune function. Continue Reading »

Quadriplegic Kiwi wakeboarder Brad Smeele back on the water

Published: April 15, 2016 | Spinal Cord Injury:

Brad Smeele wakeboardingBrad Smeele, pictured here at the recently opened cable wake park at Auckland’s Onehunga Lagoon, has been out on the water to watch his mates wakeboard on Lake Maraetai near Mangakino.

Once Brad Smeele was carefully lifted on to a speedboat for a rare excursion since a wakeboarding accident left him as a quadriplegic, he didn’t quite take to the trip like a duck to water.

The 29-year-old New Zealander, who has no feeling from the neck down since suffering a serious injury while wakeboarding in Florida in 2014 Continue Reading »

Quadriplegic man Ian Burkhart moves fingers, hand and wrist thanks to tiny computer chip in brain

Published: April 13, 2016 | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

ian-burkhart-paralysed-moves-wrist-handA quadriplegic man has been able to move his fingers, hand and wrist after having a tiny computer chip implanted in his brain. The neuroprosthetic device, which is smaller than a pea, translates neural activity in order to activate paralysed muscles.

Ian Burkhart, a 24-year-old from Ohio, was paralysed following a diving accident six years ago. The injury to his spinal cord left him unable to move his arms and legs. Paralysis is caused by a disruption of signal pathways between the brain and muscles. Previously, researchers have been able to restore movement in humans with the aid of robotics or assistive devices, but movements without these aids has only ever been achieved in non-human primates. Continue Reading »

Paralyzed Veterans of America Announces New Partnership With the Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation

Published: April 11, 2016

PVA-LogoParalyzed Veterans of America (Paralyzed Veterans) announced April 11, 2016, its new partnership with the Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation (Reeve Foundation). The organizations will work together to provide both veterans and non-veterans living with paralysis with the best and most current resources available that help educate and raise awareness of specialized care and needs.

“Paralyzed Veterans of America and the Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation are driven by a common cause: to make the world a better place for persons with spinal cord injury,” said Sherman Gillums, Jr., acting executive director of Paralyzed Veterans. Continue Reading »

Discovery in roundworms may one day help humans with spinal cord injury and paralysis

Published: April 11, 2016

roundworms may help paralysisA newly discovered pathway leading to the regeneration of central nervous system (CNS) brain cells (neurons) in a type of roundworm (C. elegans) sheds light on the adult human nervous system’s ability to regenerate.

The findings, which appear online in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, soon may lead to treatments that enhance nerve cell regeneration in humans with spinal cord injury and paralysis. Continue Reading »

Device helps paralyzed patients operate laptop with their eyes

Published: April 6, 2016 | Spinal Cord Injury:

eye-gazer device to use computerrThe movement of limbs comes so fluidly and effortlessly for many of us that it is easy to take for granted. But those who work in the VCU Health Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation know from firsthand observation that the independence that comes with mobility is a gift. That is why a VCU Health rehabilitation specialist and a technology expert teamed up to create an innovative device that gives patients with tetraplegia the ability to use a laptop with just their eyes.

Tetraplegia indicates paralysis of all four limbs or of the entire body below the neck. To accommodate patients with tetraplegia, the VCU team designed a mobile cart with an extendable arm that holds a laptop. Continue Reading »

Ekso GT™ Robotic Exoskeleton Cleared by FDA for Use With Stroke and Spinal Cord Injury Patients

Published: April 4, 2016 | Spinal Cord Injury: , , , , ,

Ekso GT Robotic ExoskeletonFirst robotic exoskeleton cleared for use with stroke and spinal cord injury levels to C7

RICHMOND, Calif., April 04, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Ekso Bionics Holdings, Inc. (OTCQB:EKSO), a robotic exoskeleton company, today announced that it has received clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to market its Ekso GT robotic exoskeleton for use in the treatment of individuals with hemiplegia due to stroke, individuals with spinal cord injuries at levels T4 to L5, and individuals with spinal cord injuries at levels of T3 to C7 (ASIA D), in accordance with device’s labeling. The Ekso GT is the first exoskeleton cleared by the FDA for use with stroke patients. Continue Reading »

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