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Spinal Cord Injury News

Spinal Cord Injury News Articles

Surgery that restores hand and elbow function in quadriplegics is underused

Published: August 23, 2016 | Spinal Cord Injury:

loyola-university-health-system-squarelogoMAYWOOD, IL – A surgery for quadriplegics called tendon transfer can significantly improve hand and elbow function, but the procedure is greatly underused, according to an article in the journal Hand Clinics by Loyola Medicine hand surgeon Michael S. Bednar, MD, FAAOS.

In the procedure, muscles that still work are redirected to do the jobs of muscles that are paralyzed. Depending on the extent of the spinal cord injury, tendon transfers can enable a patient to grasp objects, pinch, open the hand and straighten the elbow. The patient can, for example, propel a wheelchair in the snow, use a fork without splints, grip a fishing pole, shake hands and perform daily activities such as dressing, bathing, toileting and transferring to and from a wheelchair. Continue Reading »

Study says stem cell treatment can aid recovery of spinal injuries

Published: August 23, 2016

stem-cellStem Cell treatment or the Human Embryonic Stem Cells (HESC) is effective in the replacement of damaged neurons, re-establishment of lost axonal connections, and providing of neuro-protective factors to allow the healing and recovery of spinal cord injury, revealed a study.

Stem Cell treatment or the Human Embryonic Stem Cells (HESC) is effective in the replacement of damaged neurons, re-establishment of lost axonal connections, and providing of neuro-protective factors to allow the healing and recovery of spinal cord injury, revealed a study. Continue Reading »

Quadriplegic Israeli Inventor Designs Device That Allows Him to Stand

Published: August 16, 2016 | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

ReWalk-UPnRIDE-inventor-Amit-GofferNearly everyone knows about ReWalk, the revolutionary robotic exoskeleton invented in Israel that allows paraplegics to stand, walk, and even navigate steps and run marathons.

Ironically, ReWalk inventor Amit Goffer cannot use his own device because he is a quadriplegic, paralyzed from the neck down following an accident in 1997. But last summer he was finally able to leave home in an upright position, riding the most recent of his inventions — the alpha model of the UPnRIDE.

The first commercial model, UPnRIDE 1.0, will be unveiled at the Rehacare International trade fair in Düsseldorf at the end of September. Continue Reading »

Utah’s longest-living quadriplegic who never stops moving

Published: August 14, 2016 | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

becky-reeve-longest-living-quadriplegic-in-utahSALT LAKE CITY — Becky Reeve was going to be the world’s greatest missionary and then the world’s greatest mother — until a car accident on an icy road in New Mexico paralyzed her from the neck down, and she determined instead that she would be the world’s greatest handicapped person.

How’s that going?

Well, consider this: It’s been 53 years since that accident, and at 76 years old Becky is not only the oldest quadriplegic in Utah, but one of the longest-living quads in history, not far behind Wally Dutcher, a 79-year-old Florida man who was paralyzed 60 years ago in a diving accident and is recognized by Guinness World Records as the world’s oldest living quadriplegic.

So not too shabby. Continue Reading »

Gene Behind Long Body Of Snake May Help Patients With Spinal Injuries

Published: August 9, 2016

snake-OCT4Snakes owe their long and slithery bodies to “junk DNA,” large chunks of the reptile’s genome that scientists once thought to be useless. The gene called Oct4 may eventually help treat people with spinal injuries.

Oct4 is responsible for regulating stem cells and affects the growth of the trunk in the middle part of a vertebrate’s body.

Study researcher Rita Aires, from Portugal’s Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciencia (IGC), explained that genes involved in the formation of the trunk have to stop their activities so that the genes that are involved in tail formation can begin their work. Continue Reading »

German social court rules ReWalk exoskeleton medically necessary for patient with SCI

Published: August 8, 2016 | Spinal Cord Injury:

ReWalk Robotics logoReWalk Robotics announced the first ruling by the Social Welfare Court of Speyer which declared the ReWalk exoskeleton system was medically necessary and should be covered by insurance for a patient with spinal cord injury. The ruling, delivered in late July, overturns the original denial of the claim by the payer, a statutory health insurance entity, according to a press release.

The claimant, Philip Hollinger, is a 44-year-old man who sustained a spinal cord injury in a car accident in 2006. The accident left him paralyzed with a T6 level injury. Continue Reading »

Spinal cord injury patients may benefit from using exoskeleton earlier in treatment

Published: August 3, 2016

exoskeleton-studyCumming School study first in Canada to examine whether using robotic device immediately following injuries promotes recovery

Researchers from the University of Calgary’s Cumming School of Medicine are the first in Canada to examine the benefits of using an exoskeleton robotic device to rehabilitate patients with spinal cord injuries (SCI) in the days and weeks following their injury. Continue Reading »

Could this be the first smart car for quadriplegics?

Published: August 2, 2016

smart car for quadriplegics-2In a time where the driverless automated car is becoming a modern reality, we are provided with great potential to make things previously improbable if not impossible suddenly possible.

My interest was piqued when I came across design plans for car that could be controlled by a driver with quadriplegia. At first the idea seemed mere fantasy but as I spoke to transport designer Rajshekhar Dass and learnt move about the control of technical devices through brain waves, facial gestures and infinitesimal movements the idea seemed more of conceivable. Continue Reading »

Spinal cord impairment registry goes live

Published: August 1, 2016

New Zealand Spinal Cord Impairment Action Plan 2014–2019A national registry which goes live today will lead to better services and better care and support for people living with a spinal cord impairment, say Health Minister Jonathan Coleman and ACC Minister Nikki Kaye.

“This registry will collect and record a wide range of information about people throughout their lifetime, from the moment they’re affected by a spinal cord impairment,” says Dr Coleman.

“Information captured will include demographic information, details of the cause of impairment, and details of all subsequent support received, including medical, physical, psychological and social support. Continue Reading »

First clinical guidelines in Canada for pain following spinal cord injury

Published: July 27, 2016

Lawson Health Research InstituteNew research provides recommendations to help manage neuropathic pain

LONDON, ONTATIO – Researchers at Lawson Health Research Institute are the first in Canada to develop clinical practice guidelines for managing neuropathic pain with patients who have experienced a spinal cord injury (SCI).

Neuropathic pain is complex and chronic, and is the most common complication reported by people following SCI. The research team worked with care providers at Parkwood Institute, part of the St. Joseph’s Health Care London family, and an international panel to address the complex and unique challenges for managing pain during recovery and rehabilitation. Continue Reading »