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Stem Cell Agency Spinal Cord Injury Clinical Trial Passes Safety Hurdles

Published: August 31, 2016 | Category: News | Spinal Cord Injury: , ,

logo-CIRMOakland, CA – A clinical trial using stem cells to treat people with recent spinal cord injuries has cleared two key safety hurdles, and been given approval to expand the therapy to a larger group of patients with a much higher dose of cells.

Asterias Biotherapeutics announced that its Data Monitoring Committee (DMC) has reviewed the safety data from the first two groups of patients treated and found no problems or adverse side effects. One group of three patients was given 2 million cells. The second group of five patients received 10 million cells. Asterias is now cleared to enroll another 5-8 patients with 20 million cells. Continue Reading »

Paralympic Athlete Josh Roberts Going for Gold in Rio

Published: August 31, 2016 | Category: News

Paralympic athlete Josh Roberts.Most of us expect to sweat when we get hot. But imagine if you couldn’t sweat. This condition actually affects many people with spinal cord injuries – like Alabama native Josh Roberts. Roberts will be in Rio de Janeiro this September for his third Paralympic Games. He’s a member of the 66-person U.S. track team and occasionally trains on the indoor track at Lakeshore Foundation, the Paralympic training center in Homewood. He’ll be competing in the men’s 100-meter track event in Rio. In contrast, he’s also racing in the much longer 1500-meter. Continue Reading »

A Paralyzed Florida Surfer Finds His Own ‘Perfect Wave’

Published: August 31, 2016 | Category: News | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

Matt Bellina Surfing againFor engineer Matt Bellina, of Cocoa Beach, Fla., riding the perfect wave was a group mission.

More than 15 friends gathered on Florida’s Cocoa Beach on a Saturday morning this summer. Their task? Get 40-year-old Bellina back into the water surfing.

It wasn’t easy. On Memorial Day, 2014, the Bellina broke his neck, as he slid head-first down a water slide and into an inflatable wall. Bellina broke his C4 vertebra and damaged his high-cervical nerve. He’s one of an estimated 17,000 Americans each year who suffer a spinal cord injury and live. Bellina can’t walk, and has limited arm movement. Continue Reading »

Cure for spinal cord injuries nose ahead with nasal cell transplants

Published: August 28, 2016 | Category: News

Research-leader-James-St-JohnQUEENSLAND researchers are a step closer to human trials of a potential treatment for spinal cord injuries involving transplants of nasal cells combined with physiotherapy.

Griffith University neuroscientist James St John said he hoped to start a trial within three years on the research after receiving more than $250,000 in funding from the Perry Cross Spinal Research Foundation.

Dr St John said he had been in preliminary discussions with neurosurgeons and physiotherapists at Brisbane’s Princess Alexandra Hospital but he needed $700,000 a year over three years before the trial could begin. Continue Reading »

How SoCal Doctors Used Basketball to Rehabilitate Paralyzed Vets

Published: August 23, 2016 | Category: Information

The Devils vs Oakland Bittners in 1947The popular wheelchair sport helped to launch the Paralympics in 1960

Jerry Fesenmeyer was an 18-year-old Iowa farm boy when he and his fellow marines from the First Division engaged in a desperate firefight with Japanese soldiers on the island of Okinawa. The date was June 5, 1945. Fesenmeyer was advancing toward Shuri Castle when he spotted an enemy soldier perched in a tree. He jumped from behind a wall to surprise him, only to find himself looking down the barrel of a Nambu sniper rifle.

The bullet entered Fesenmeyer’s chest between the heart and the shoulder, clipped a lung, and exited through his spine. Blood shot from his body like a geyser. “Fessy’s hit! Fessy’s hit!” someone was yelling as he blacked out. Continue Reading »

Surgery that restores hand and elbow function in quadriplegics is underused

Published: August 23, 2016 | Category: News | Spinal Cord Injury:

loyola-university-health-system-squarelogoMAYWOOD, IL – A surgery for quadriplegics called tendon transfer can significantly improve hand and elbow function, but the procedure is greatly underused, according to an article in the journal Hand Clinics by Loyola Medicine hand surgeon Michael S. Bednar, MD, FAAOS.

In the procedure, muscles that still work are redirected to do the jobs of muscles that are paralyzed. Depending on the extent of the spinal cord injury, tendon transfers can enable a patient to grasp objects, pinch, open the hand and straighten the elbow. The patient can, for example, propel a wheelchair in the snow, use a fork without splints, grip a fishing pole, shake hands and perform daily activities such as dressing, bathing, toileting and transferring to and from a wheelchair. Continue Reading »

Study says stem cell treatment can aid recovery of spinal injuries

Published: August 23, 2016 | Category: News

stem-cellStem Cell treatment or the Human Embryonic Stem Cells (HESC) is effective in the replacement of damaged neurons, re-establishment of lost axonal connections, and providing of neuro-protective factors to allow the healing and recovery of spinal cord injury, revealed a study.

Stem Cell treatment or the Human Embryonic Stem Cells (HESC) is effective in the replacement of damaged neurons, re-establishment of lost axonal connections, and providing of neuro-protective factors to allow the healing and recovery of spinal cord injury, revealed a study. Continue Reading »

Monitoring upper-limb recovery after cervical spinal cord injury: insights beyond assessment scores.

Published: August 18, 2016 | Category: Information

Background: Pre-clinical investigations in animal models demonstrate that enhanced upper-limb (UL) activity during rehabilitation promotes motor recovery following spinal cord injury (SCI). Despite this, following SCI in humans, no commonly applied training protocols exist and therefore activity-based rehabilitative therapies (ABRT) vary in frequency, duration and intensity. Quantification of UL recovery is limited to subjective questionnaires or scattered measures of muscle function and movement tasks. Continue Reading »

Mason Ellis – Explaining Tenodesis

Published: August 16, 2016 | Category: Featured Videos | Spinal Cord Injury: , , ,

This is a video of Mason Ellis explaining Tenodesis (movement of the wrist to move fingers). Mason is a C5, C6, C7 Complete Quadriplegic (Paralysis of all four limbs) with little tricep function.

Subscribe to Mason Ellis on YouTube and check out his other great videos.

Continue Reading »

Quadriplegic Israeli Inventor Designs Device That Allows Him to Stand

Published: August 16, 2016 | Category: News | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

ReWalk-UPnRIDE-inventor-Amit-GofferNearly everyone knows about ReWalk, the revolutionary robotic exoskeleton invented in Israel that allows paraplegics to stand, walk, and even navigate steps and run marathons.

Ironically, ReWalk inventor Amit Goffer cannot use his own device because he is a quadriplegic, paralyzed from the neck down following an accident in 1997. But last summer he was finally able to leave home in an upright position, riding the most recent of his inventions — the alpha model of the UPnRIDE.

The first commercial model, UPnRIDE 1.0, will be unveiled at the Rehacare International trade fair in Düsseldorf at the end of September. Continue Reading »