SUBSCRIBE: RSS Feed for Spinal Cord Injury Zone Email Updates Follow Spinal Cord Injury Zone on Twitter Spinal Cord Injury Zone on Facebook

Browsing Articles by Date

Essendon woman takes up Run Melbourne challenge in wheelchair

Published: July 8, 2015 | Category: News | Spinal Cord Injury: , , , ,

Georgina Fiorentino GEORGINA Fiorentino thought her life was over when she lost feeling in her legs and became reliant on a wheelchair.

“You go through a whole process in your mind that it’s all too hard,” the Essendon North resident said.

“A lot of people have no idea the bits and pieces that follow on from a spinal injury.

“There are so many other things that are affected that are worse than not being able to walk.” Continue Reading »

Paralyzed Cyclist Takes the Ride of His Life

Published: July 4, 2015 | Category: Featured Videos | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

Martyn Ashton wants to inspire others

In 2013, stunt cyclist Martyn Ashton, a former world champion mountain biker, crashed during a cycling event and was left paralyzed from the waist down. Continue Reading »

What a Scuba Diver with a Spinal Cord Injury Has to Teach Us About the Learning Process

Published: April 27, 2015 | Category: News | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

Stan ClawsonStan Clawson loves to open the door for people. “They don’t expect it,” he says. Clawson, a filmmaker and communications professor based in Salt Lake City, is in his late 30s with sandy hair, blue eyes, and a handlebar mustache. He’s tall, “six-foot-four,” he says,  “you know… laying down. Upright? I’m not sure. Maybe four-foot-eight? Four-ten?”

Clawson has the deep, dynamic voice of a radio announcer and something of the devil in him. He’s been in a wheelchair since a rock climbing accident when he was 20 years old, when he fell 49 feet and severed his spinal cord between the T9 and T10 vertebrae. Since then, he’s learned to boogie board and downhill ski. He’s competed in marathons. And he’s earned advanced certifications as an open water diver. Continue Reading »

KC man doesn’t allow spinal cord injury to hinder him from having a normal life

Published: September 25, 2014 | Category: News | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

adam laneKANSAS CITY, Mo. — September is Spinal Cord Injury Awareness Month. About 200,000 people in the United States are affected, including metro man Adam Lane.

Ever since a motorcycle accident seven years ago, Lane has had to learn how to navigate life on another set of wheels. When he’s not driving, Lane is rolling. It’s a skill he learned after his accident.

“The bike threw me and I went head first into a 4×4 sign post,” he explained. Continue Reading »

Senior aims to raise awareness about spinal cord injuries

Published: May 12, 2014 | Category: News | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

Jennifer-Bou-LahoudHelped by the Physically Challenged Athletes Scholarship Fund, Jennifer Bou Lahoud targets a career in neuroscience

Jennifer Bou Lahoud walks confidently, with purpose, in front of her USC Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences classmates with her diploma in hand. In her mind’s eye, at least, she walks as she used to, before the accident — the way she dreams she’ll someday walk again.

In 2008, the 16-year-old from West Covina, Calif., went on a ski trip with family and friends that took a tragic turn. Bou Lahoud skidded off her sled and slammed into a bed of rocks and packed snow.

“The moment I landed, I felt paralyzed,” she said. Everything she knew was about to change. Continue Reading »

Optimal site for cell transplantation to treat spinal cord injury investigated

Published: November 21, 2013 | Category: News | Spinal Cord Injury:

After laboratory mice received a contusive spinal cord injury at the T10 level, low and high doses of neural stem/progenitor cells (NS/PCs) derived from fetal bioluminescent-labeled transgenic mice were injected into four groups of mice at either the lesion epicenter or at rostral and caudal sites. A control group was similarly injected with phosphate buffered saline. The mice receiving the NS/PC cells experienced motor functional recovery while those in the control group did not.

It is known that transplanting neural stem/progenitor cells (NS/PCs) into the spinal cord promotes functional recovery after spinal cord injury (SCI). However, which transplantation sites provide optimal benefit? Continue Reading »

Treadmill step training promotes motor function after incomplete spinal cord injury

Published: November 5, 2013 | Category: News | Spinal Cord Injury:

treadmill step trainingA large body of evidence shows that spinal circuits are significantly affected by training, and that intrinsic circuits that drive locomotor tasks are located in lumbosacral spinal segments in rats with complete spinal cord transection. However, after incomplete lesions, the effect of treadmill training has been debated, which is likely because of the difficulty of separating spontaneous stepping from specific training-induced effects.

According to a study published in the Neural Regeneration Research (Vol. 8, No. 27, 2013), a rat model of spinal cord contusion at the T10 level was used to examine the effect of step training. Continue Reading »

FDA approval to move forward with Phase I safety trial using Schwann cells in SCI

Published: August 1, 2012 | Category: Featured Information | Spinal Cord Injury: , , , , , , , ,

The Miami Project to Cure Paralysis, a Center of Excellence at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, has received permission from the Food and Drug Administration to begin a Phase 1 clinical trial to evaluate the safety of transplanting human Schwann cells to treat patients with recent spinal cord injuries.

We are not recruiting anybody until we obtain approval from our Institutional Review Board.

This trial is just 1 brick in the wall. We will continue working with our scientific colleagues to test other “bricks” in the wall to ultimately develop a strong defense to prevent or reverse the many effects of paralysis. Continue Reading »

Restoring Function After Spinal Cord Injury With Nerve Transplant: The New Frontier

Published: September 22, 2011 | Category: News | Spinal Cord Injury: , , ,

As of yet, scientists and researchers have not been able to completely reverse the damage caused by spinal cord injury, but a core group of experts in this fast-moving field have been making advances with therapies that can return function and make life easier for SCI patients.

On Nov. 5, the Institute for Advanced Reconstruction at The Plastic Surgery Center in Shrewsbury, N.J., will be hosting a symposium for medical professionals to discuss advancement in treatment for SCI patients. Continue Reading »

Project Mina Enables Upright Mobility for Those Who Have Lost the Ability to Walk

Published: April 5, 2011 | Category: News | Spinal Cord Injury: , ,

IHMC Unveils the MINA Robotic Device

PENSACOLA, Fla., April 5, 2011 — Today, Dr. Kenneth Ford, Director and CEO of the Florida Institute for Human & Machine Cognition (IHMC), joined institute researchers to unveil Mina, a robotic exoskeleton developed to restore ambulation for individuals afflicted with paraplegia, hemiplegia, paresis, asthenia, and functional muscle loss. Developed by the IHMC robotics team led by Dr. Peter Neuhaus and Dr. Jerry Pratt, Mina acts as a pair of robotic legs that assist people, who have lost their ability to walk, in regaining upright mobility when outfitted with the device. Future applications of Mina are envisioned to span from rehabilitating those with stroke and spinal cord injuries, to augmenting human strength capabilities when operating in complex mobility environments. Continue Reading »