SUBSCRIBE: RSS Feed for Spinal Cord Injury Zone Email Updates Follow Spinal Cord Injury Zone on Twitter Spinal Cord Injury Zone on Facebook

Articles Tagged: Assistive Technology

Tecla expands its accessibility features for users with limited mobility to IOT devices

Published: April 24, 2017 | Category: News

For the past seven years, the Canadian technology developer Komodo Openlabs has been working on a device called Tecla that allow users with limited mobility to control electronic devices.

Designed for users who have trouble operating smartphones, tablets, or computers because of limited upper-body mobility caused by spinal cord injuries, multiple sclerosis, ALS, muscular dystrophy, cerebral palsy, brain injuries or a stroke, the original Tecla product could only work with one device at a time. Continue Reading »

LipSync Pilot: Recruitment is Underway

Published: April 21, 2017 | Category: Featured News

An estimated 1,000,000 people in Canada and the United States have limited or no use of their arms—meaning they are unable to use touchscreen devices that could provide access to helpful apps and services. Continue Reading »

GlassOuse Assistive Device

Published: February 8, 2017 | Category: Links

GlassOuse.com

GlassOuse is the assistive device which lets disabled people control their computer, tablet, mobile phone, tv via head movements.

Anyone can use GlassOuse to control devices HANDS FREE, especially people who are not able to use hands.

GlassOuse is a device developed for people with disabilities to control technology HANDS FREE. GlassOuse involves complex features such as 9 Axis gyroscope and smart battery. To use: simply connect via Bluetooth to device, control cursor via head movements and bite to make a click. Continue Reading »

GlassOuse: the world’s first assistive mouse

Published: February 1, 2017 | Category: Featured Information

GlassOuse is a device developed for people with disabilities to control technology HANDS FREE. GlassOuse involves complex features such as 9 Axis gyroscope and smart battery. To use: simply connect via Bluetooth to device, control cursor via head movements and bite to make a click.


Continue Reading »

Assistive Technology: A Love Story

Published: January 31, 2017 | Category: Videos | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

Todd Stabelfeldt and Karen StabelfeldtTecla user’s love story comes true with the help of assistive technology

TORONTO, January 31, 2017 – In a world where most communication now occurs via text instead of in person, one out of five cell phone owners report feeling closer to their spouse or partner because of exchanges they’ve had via text message and eighty percent report that they’ve “sexted” within the past year. But what if you couldn’t enjoy the intimacy of private texting due to limited mobility? You might say that Tecla — which allows individuals with limited upper body mobility to use their mobile devices hands-free — is a dating game-changer. Continue Reading »

Digital glasses for people without use of arms wins major award in Dundee

Published: January 21, 2017 | Category: News | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

Digital glasses which assist people who don’t have the use of their arms have been named the best new product at a prestigious awards ceremony.

GlassOuses, which use Bluetooth to connect to computers, phones and televisions, won the prize at the Blackwood Design Awards. The glasses were the brainchild of Mehmet Turker, who is based in Hong Kong.

Judges from across Scottish industries opted to give the top prize to the glasses in a category which also included a brace for people who have a weakness in the knee or an injury that impairs their ability to stand or walk independently. Continue Reading »

inventability.net

Published: January 8, 2017 | Category: Links

Inventions, hacks, fixes, tutorials, tips… Invent/ability is a collection of useful solutions to everyday problems like: how to drink coffee without using your hands, how to hack a wheelchair, and how to smartify your home.

Stuart is quadriplegic; he can’t use his arms and legs at all; he can move his head and has about 5mm of reliable control in his right middle finger, and he has severe, complex, and degenerating health issues. This is far from the most interesting thing about him, but it’s important to grasp the extent to which he must “act at a distance” by designing systems and processes to carry out the business of daily living without physical contact. Imagine a house with no light switches, no door handles, no buttons on the phone or taps on the sink or knobs on the boiler. Continue Reading »

Magic Fingers SMS Helper – Connect SMS Messages to IFTTT

Published: January 6, 2017 | Category: Links | Spinal Cord Injury:

Who is it For?

Anybody really, but I (Stuart Turner) am quadriplegic and we developed this so I could call for help, especially in the middle of the night. Using Magic Fingers I can use the voice recognition on my smartphone to text message my smart lightbulbs and flash them different colours (blue for assistance, red for emergency help, etc). In this way I can signal carers or family immediately, wherever they are in the house, without yelling for ages. It’s obviously highly adaptable and extensible, however, and can be used to “press” many kinds of “button” / trigger many kinds of actions. Continue Reading »

Technology helps quadriplegic Miss. man hunt deer, drive, paint

Published: November 28, 2016 | Category: News | Spinal Cord Injury: , ,

evan-edwards-2MERIDIAN, Miss. — A little more than 30 years ago, as an 11th grader, Evan Edwards broke his neck during a tackle in a football game. A C4-5 quadriplegic, the eastern Mississippi man cannot move his lower body, wrists or hands.

He eats by moving special utensils tucked into his wrist brace with his shoulder and elbow. His Mississippi State University cup — representing his alma mater — hooks onto his arm so he can drink from the extra-long straw. A pointer on the end of his brace acts like a finger, pushing the buttons that unlock his van and activate his voice-command environmental controls. Continue Reading »

A Reboot For Wheelchair That Can Stand Up And Climb Stairs

Published: October 17, 2016 | Category: News

ibot-wheelchair-1Thirteen years ago, just as the United States began what was to become its longest war, a futuristic wheelchair hit the market.

The iBOT allowed paralyzed people, including many veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan, to stand up by rising to eye level. It also did something no wheelchair ever had: climb stairs.

But even though users loved it, the iBOT went out of production in 2009 when Johnson & Johnson discontinued it. Continue Reading »