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Articles Tagged: Cancer

Cancer Drug Improves Movement in Rats with Spine Injury

Published: January 30, 2011 | Category: News

Researchers say the anti-cancer drug Taxol, normally used to treat breast cancer, might also hold promise as a way to help people recover from crippling spinal cord injuries.

Researchers at Max Planck Institute of Neurobiology in Germany report that Taxol improves movement and function in rats with spine injuries, by promoting nerve regeneration. They say the drug appears to eliminate the physical obstacles that normally prevent injured nerve cells from regrowing axons. Continue Reading »

Cancer Drug Aids The Regeneration Of Spinal Cord Injuries

Published: January 28, 2011 | Category: News

Taxol stabilizes growing nerve cells and reduces the barrier-function of scar tissue

After a spinal cord injury a number of factors impede the regeneration of nerve cells. Two of the most important of these factors are the destabilization of the cytoskeleton and the development of scar tissue. While the former prevents regrowth of cells, the latter creates a barrier for severed nerve cells. Scientists of the Max Planck Institute of Neurobiology in Martinsried and their colleagues from the Kennedy Krieger Institute and University of Miami in the United States, and the University of Utrecht in the Netherlands, have now shown that the cancer drug Taxol reduces both regeneration obstacles. Science, January 27, 2011 Continue Reading »

The Brave Ability Of Joni Tada

Published: November 19, 2010 | Category: News

One man’s trash is another man’s treasure. Especially when it’s a discarded wheelchair.

Tens of thousands of disabled people in developing countries enjoy the dignity of moving about in rehabilitated wheelchairs, thanks to Joni Eareckson Tada.

The minister and disability-rights advocate has touched countless lives with her wheelchair project.

But she might never have had such an impact had it not been for one fateful summer day in 1967.

Just 17, she dived off a raft in Maryland’s Chesapeake Bay and fractured her spinal cord, paralyzing herself from the neck down. Continue Reading »

Everett talks about his recovery from paralysis

Published: October 12, 2010 | Category: News

HOUSTON (KTRK) — Three years ago, a hit on the football field left Kevin Everett paralyzed. He became one of the 300,000 Americans living with spinal cord injuries.

Everett has recovered from his injury, and he credits his faith, rehab and something rarely done for spinal cord injury: cooling.

In 2007, Everett’s promising career with the Buffalo Bills came to an end with one hit. Continue Reading »

Governor signs spinal cord injury research bill

Published: October 3, 2010 | Category: News

San Jose, CA (October 3) — Students and teachers rejoiced! Athletes rejoiced! So with parents and advocates of spinal cord injury research, who applauded Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger signing into law the bill extending the Roman Reed Spinal Cord Injury Act which was set to expire January 1, 2011.

The bill was sponsored by Assemblyman Alberto Torrico enabling the state to continue California’s spinal cord research fund through the University of California. Continue Reading »

How injured nerves grow themselves back

Published: September 27, 2010 | Category: Information

Unlike nerves of the spinal cord, the peripheral nerves that connect our limbs and organs to the central nervous system have an astonishing ability to regenerate themselves after injury. Now, a new report in the October 1st issue of Cell, a Cell Press publication, offers new insight into how that healing process works.

“We know a lot about how various cell types differentiate during development, but after a serious injury like an amputation, nerves must re-grow,” said Allison Lloyd of University College London. “They need a new mechanism to do that because the developmental signals aren’t there.” Continue Reading »

Effect on stem cell ruling on companies unclear

Published: August 25, 2010 | Category: News

(Reuters) – Government officials say they will appeal a U.S. District Court injunction that stops new federal funding of human embryonic stem cell research.

The ruling has no direct effect on researchers or companies working with private funds, but government funding often kick-starts the most basic, and risky biological work.

Scientists are working to use them to repair severed spinal cords, regenerate brain cells lost in Parkinson’s disease and restore the tissue destroyed by juvenile diabetes. Continue Reading »

Adult stem cell research far ahead of embryonic

Published: August 2, 2010 | Category: News

NEW YORK — A few months ago, Dr. Thomas Einhorn was treating a patient with a broken ankle that wouldn’t heal, even with multiple surgeries. So he sought help from the man’s own body.

Einhorn drew bone marrow from the man’s pelvic bone with a needle, condensed it to about four teaspoons of rich red liquid, and injected that into his ankle.

Four months later the ankle was healed. Einhorn, chairman of orthopedic surgery at Boston University Medical Center, credits “adult” stem cells in the marrow injection. He tried it because of published research from France. Continue Reading »

Battling paralysis

Published: May 4, 2010 | Category: Information

Americans’ love affair with automobiles has come with a cost higher than the price of the cars. Although stroke is the leading cause of paralysis in this country, auto accidents account for 41.3 of the nation’s paralyzing spinal cord injuries.

That’s tragic, of course, but there is some good news: Very promising research is taking place at the University of Louisville’s Kentucky Spinal Cord Injury Research Center and the University of Kentucky’s Spinal Cord & Brain Injury Research Center. Continue Reading »

Scientists discover cause of destructive inflammations

Published: March 3, 2010 | Category: Information

The signaling molecule CD95L, known as “death messenger,” causes an inflammatory process in injured tissue after spinal cord injuries and prevents its healing. This discovery was published by scientists of the German Cancer Research Center. In mice, the researchers found out that if they switch off CD95L, the injured spinal cord heals and the animals regain better ability to move. Therefore, substances which block the death messenger might offer a new approach in the treatment of severe inflammatory diseases. Continue Reading »