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Articles Tagged: Government

DisabilityAdvisor.com

Published: April 23, 2017 | Category: Links

DisabilityAdvisor.com

Navigating the disability benefits maze can be difficult, stressful and risky. And trying to find the information and answers you need can be overwhelming, time consuming and frustrating. That’s where DisabilityAdvisor.com makes a BIG difference!

As you explore our site, you’ll find an exclusive selection of helpful articles, videos, ebooks, checklists and more – none of which are available on any other site. Everything is created by our team of experts who hail from various professional fields, including law, financial management, social work, and so on.

Working or volunteering after a Spinal Cord Injury

Published: March 20, 2017 | Category: Information

The majority of spinal cord injuries are still caused by traumatic events, such as road traffic accidents or falls. Sports injuries and violence are also common causes of spinal cord injuries. A (so-called) non-traumatic injury can occur because of arthritis, inflammation, infections or disc degeneration of the spine that can cause compression and therefore damage to the spinal cord. The incidence of non-traumatic injuries is increasing, partly due to better reporting but also due to the impact of an increasingly aging population. Continue Reading »

Makeshift Syrian rehab center offers hope to paralyzed

Published: March 16, 2017 | Category: News

DOUMA, Syria, March 15 (Reuters) – Ziad, a paralyzed 14-year-old boy, often stays alone in his room as bombs fall on Douma, the main rebel-stronghold in eastern Ghouta on the outskirts of the Syrian capital Damascus.

Limited in scope, number and size, there are no nearby shelters equipped to receive Ziad who cannot be moved quickly or easily during airstrikes because of his spinal injuries.

“The shelters are not ready to accept people like me,” he said.

Until last year, treatment options were limited for spinal patients caught in a brutal civil war that has killed hundreds of thousands of people and displaced more than 11 million. Continue Reading »

Archer’s Challenge Has Able-Bodied People Use Wheelchairs to Highlight Inaccessibility

Published: October 11, 2016 | Category: News | Spinal Cord Injury:

chikage-windler-archers-challengeThis week, hundreds of able-bodied people in Austin, Texas, will spend the day in a wheelchair to raise awareness of the accessibility issues people who use wheelchairs and other mobility devices face on a daily basis.

The initiative, known as Archer’s Challenge, was started by 20-year-old Archer Hadley, who has cerebral palsy. Archer’s Challenge began in 2015, after Hadley was frustrated by the lack of automatic doors at his school. Continue Reading »

Spinal cord injury patients in Australia call for national register to help track treatment, outcomes

Published: March 20, 2016 | Category: News

wheelchair racer Jonathan TangSpinal cord injury experts in Australia have lobbied the Federal Government to establish a national register tracking the treatment and condition of patients.

Advocates believe more data could save the health system millions of dollars and improve the outcomes of people living with spinal cord injury (SCI).

Chris Bertinshaw from the Australiasian SCI Network said very little data was kept on people living with a spinal injury. Continue Reading »

Governor Brown Vetoes Paralysis Cure Research Bill

Published: September 18, 2012 | Category: News

The Governor of California has just dealt a devastating blow to paralysis cure research.

Yesterday afternoon, driving home after a trip to Sacramento to talk to Secretary of Health Diana Dooley, who was very supportive about the research, I received a phone call on my cell. It was from Jeff Barbosa, legislative director to Assemblymember Bob Wieckowski.

Uh-oh. Continue Reading »

No traffic fines for research

Published: August 28, 2012 | Category: News

AB 1657, which would devote $1 from certain traffic tickets to fund spinal cord injury research, is well-meaning but misguided. If the state is going to increase traffic fines, the revenue should pay for underfunded basic services.

Who would be so cruel, so selfish, as to deny money for spinal cord injury research? Unless you wish further harm to people who are paralyzed or otherwise disabled by spinal injury, certainly you want Californians to open up their wallets to fund studies, right? Continue Reading »

Embryonic Stem-Cell Funding Challenge Should Be Dismissed, U.S. Says

Published: June 24, 2011 | Category: News

A challenge to funding of human embryonic stem-cell studies should be dismissed after an appeals court found the government-backed research to be lawful, the Obama administration said.

The Justice Department in a filing today urged U.S. District Judge Royce Lamberth to end a lawsuit that seeks to block the U.S. Health and Human Services Department and the National Institutes of Health from spending federal funds on researching human embryonic stem-cells, known as hESC.

Last year, Lamberth temporarily barred U.S. agencies from funding human embryonic research, finding it likely violated a 1996 law called the Dickey-Wicker Amendment. The law prevents the government from spending money on research where a human embryo is damaged or destroyed. Continue Reading »

Rick Hansen set to re-enact his Man in Motion journey

Published: February 2, 2011 | Category: News

Relay involving 7,000 Canadians chosen from 600 communities along the route will begin on 25th anniversary of historic trek

When an exhausted but triumphant Rick Hansen pushed himself into Vancouver on May 22, 1987, after circling the globe in a wheelchair for two years, the miles were all behind him but the journey was just beginning. Continue Reading »

Promise of stem cells fulfilled

Published: November 6, 2010 | Category: News

clinical trial in Atlanta, Georgia, is proof that informed public debate is the key to medical advance

IF I’m honest, my first reaction to recent reports that the first human embryonic stem cell trial had begun on spinal patients in Atlanta was one of nonchalance.

Not because of its potential significance to those of us with spinal injuries — desperate for any news of progress — but because of the stop-start nature of the trial, plagued as it has been by legislative and regulatory restraints. Continue Reading »