Saturday, October 10th 2015

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Articles Tagged: Legal

The way forward

Published: July 18, 2015 | Category: News | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

BasileIt was the beginning of a summer that promised to be one of his best ever.

Josh Basile loved his new job as a lawyer at a top medical malpractice firm in Washington. He was smitten with a pretty, dark-haired young woman he’d started dating. And he was planning a big party to mark a momentous milestone: the 10-year anniversary of the day a wave slammed his body head-first into the hard sand of a Delaware beach, crushing the fifth vertebra below his skull and transforming him instantly from an 18-year-old college tennis player into a young man who could not brush his own teeth. Continue Reading »

Colorado court rules fired medical marijuana patient can’t get job back

Published: June 15, 2015 | Category: News | Spinal Cord Injury:

DENVER, CO - SEPTEMBER 30: Brandon Coats leaves the courthouse at the end of the hearing with his attorney Michael Evans, right. The Colorado Supreme Court listens to arguments in the the case of Brandon Coats, a quadriplegic medical marijuana patient who was fired from his job at Dish Network after testing positive for marijuana. A written decision by the court will be issued at a later date.  (Kathryn Scott Osler/The Denver Post via Getty Images)

Brandon Coats is a quadriplegic who was fired by Dish Network after failing a drug test in 2010. The company said it has a zero-tolerance drug policy.

Cannabis consumption is cause to be fired in Colorado, the state’s supreme court has ruled, despite the drug’s legal status and the appeal of a quadriplegic man who was fired for using medical marijuana. Continue Reading »

Spinal cord injury and SSD benefits

Published: February 25, 2015 | Category: Information

Spinal cord injury and SSD benefitsBetween 12,000 and 20,000 people will sustain spinal cord injuries this year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Another 200,000 people, including many Chicago residents, already live with these injuries. While recovery is possible after some spinal cord injuries, severe injuries may cause paralysis and other permanent complications. If a spinal cord injury significantly restricts a person’s daily functioning and ability to work, the victim may be eligible for Social Security Disability benefits. Continue Reading »

No traffic fines for research

Published: August 28, 2012 | Category: News

AB 1657, which would devote $1 from certain traffic tickets to fund spinal cord injury research, is well-meaning but misguided. If the state is going to increase traffic fines, the revenue should pay for underfunded basic services.

Who would be so cruel, so selfish, as to deny money for spinal cord injury research? Unless you wish further harm to people who are paralyzed or otherwise disabled by spinal injury, certainly you want Californians to open up their wallets to fund studies, right? Continue Reading »

US court victory for embryonic stem cell research

Published: August 1, 2011 | Category: Featured News

A District Court judge in the US has dismissed a lawsuit that sought to ban federal funding for human embryonic stem cell (hESC) research. The decision, by Judge Royce Lambeth, is the latest development in the case of Sherley v Sebelius – a landmark lawsuit filed against the US’s state-funded National Institutes of Health (NIH) in 2009.

The case was brought by two scientists, Dr James Sherley and Dr Theresa Deisher, who opposed changes to NIH guidelines that expanded hESC research following an executive order by President Barack Obama. This order eased restrictions on hESC research imposed by the previous President, George W. Bush, but the pair, who both work with adult stem cells, argued the new guidelines violated the Dickey-Wicker Amendment. This is a 1996 law which bars the use of federal funds for ‘research in which a human embryo or embryos are destroyed’. Continue Reading »

Curing Paralysis – Again

Published: May 20, 2011 | Category: News

An article by Rob Stein on the front page of today’s Washington Post (May 20, 2011) announces a stunning breakthrough treatment for paralysis that has transformed the life of a man who was paralyzed in a car accident.  The successful experimental treatment involves electrical stimulation of his damaged spinal cord through implanted electrodes.  Scientists are still not exactly sure how it works, but it does.  For one individual reading this article, this breakthrough was very old news—more than 27 years old. Continue Reading »

Germany shuts down stem cell clinic

Published: May 10, 2011 | Category: News

BERLIN, May 10 (UPI) — German authorities say they’ve closed down a controversial clinic offering unproven stem cell treatments for a variety of physical conditions.

The XCell clinic had been treating disorders including cerebral palsy, Parkinson’s disease and spinal cord injury, reported Tuesday. Continue Reading »

Parking spots for disabled abused, misused

Published: April 1, 2011 | Category: News

DAYTONA BEACH – When Charles “Jay” Ayres joined the Army, he had no idea that years later, his biggest fight would be for parking spaces to get in and out of his van.

Mr. Ayres is not the only driver with disabilities who deals with the lack of ‘handicapped parking’ spots. Recognizing this, the Volusia County Sheriff’s Office recently added 32 volunteers to help protect accessible parking spots for Mr. Ayres and other drivers with disabilities. Continue Reading »

Denial of customized power wheelchairs sparks federal lawsuit

Published: February 23, 2011 | Category: News

The Texas Commission on Health and Human Services’ denial of customized power wheelchairs has sparked a lawsuit in federal court.

Plaintiffs Bradley Koenning, 23, Brian Martin, 27, and Morgan Ryals, 25, all three of whom are disabled Medicaid beneficiaries, sued Thomas Suehs, executive commissioner of The Texas Commission on Health and Human Services (HHSC), on Feb. 15. Continue Reading »

Quadriplegic visitor sues Disney after stuck on ride

Published: February 9, 2011 | Category: News

A quadriplegic Disneyland visitor is suing the parent company for failing to evacuate him from the broken “it’s a small world” ride, the lawsuit says, prompting dangerously high blood pressure.

Jose Martinez of San Pedro filed the lawsuit in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles on Monday, saying the Walt Disney Co. violated the Americans with Disabilities Act by failing to have adequate evacuation procedures for visitors with mobility disabilities.

The suit has been moved to the federal court in Santa Ana, said Shawna Parks, Martinez’s attorney and legal director with the Disability Rights Legal Center. Continue Reading »