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Articles Tagged: Medical Research

Drug aims to help treat spinal cord injuries

Published: July 25, 2017 | Category: News

Researchers at ReNetX Bio are hoping a new name, the potential for a new influx of cash on the horizon and a new chief executive officer are the winning combination needed to bring its lead drug candidate to market.

ReNetX Bio is looking to guide its drug candidate, Nogo Trap, through its first round of clinical trials. Company officials say Nogo Trap is designed to help patients with chronic spinal cord injury. Continue Reading »

Lab-Grown Neurons Could Help Heal Spinal Injuries and Restore Movement

Published: April 26, 2017 | Category: Featured News Videos

Researchers grew human spinal cord neurons from stem cells and injected them into healthy mice, where they successfully connected with other neurons. Continue Reading »

Shirley Ryan AbilityLab

Published: April 11, 2017 | Category: Links

www.sralab.org

As the #1 referral choice for SCI patients from all over the world, we are renowned for innovative, interdisciplinary care. By integrating advances in research and technology, we continuously enhance medical and functional outcomes.

You want to recover what’s most important in your life — be it mobility, independence or walking again. Together we reach for those goals.

Doctors and nurses in our Spinal Cord Innovation Center provide specialized care. Our state-of-the-art Ability Labs infuse science into treatment. The goal: helping you get your life back. Continue Reading »

Brain implants allow paralysed monkeys to walk

Published: November 9, 2016 | Category: Featured News Videos

Swiss researchers travel to China to conduct pioneering experiment.

For more than a decade, neuroscientist Grégoire Courtine has been flying every few months from his lab at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne to another lab in Beijing, China, where he conducts research on monkeys with the aim of treating spinal-cord injuries. Continue Reading »

Human Neuron Transplants Treat Spinal Cord Injury in Mice

Published: September 22, 2016 | Category: News

mge_spheroidsChronic pain and loss of bladder control are among the most devastating consequences of spinal cord injury, rated by many patients as a higher priority for treatment than paralysis or numbness. Now a UC San Francisco team has transplanted immature human neurons into mice with spinal cord injuries, and shown that the cells successfully wire up with the damaged spinal cord to improve bladder control and reduce pain. This is a key step towards developing cell therapies for spinal cord injury in humans, say the researchers, who are currently working to develop the technique for future clinical trials. Continue Reading »

Scientists pinpoint molecular signal that drives and enables spinal cord repair

Published: March 17, 2016 | Category: News

lesion core after a spinal cord injuryResearchers from King’s College London and the University of Oxford have identified a molecular signal, known as ‘neuregulin-1’, which drives and enables the spinal cord’s natural capacity for repair after injury.

The findings, published today in Brain, could one day lead to new treatments which enhance this spontaneous repair mechanism by manipulating the neuregulin-1 signal.

Every year more than 130,000 people suffer traumatic spinal cord injury (usually from a road traffic accident, fall or sporting injury) and related healthcare costs are among the highest of any medical condition – yet there is still no cure or adequate treatment. Continue Reading »

Study Identifies Specific Gene Network That Promotes Nervous System Repair

Published: February 18, 2016 | Category: News

UCLAFindings by UCLA-led collaboration are an early step toward potential treatments for injuries to the central nervous system

Newswise — Whether or not nerve cells are able to regrow after injury depends on their location in the body. Injured nerve cells in the peripheral nervous system, such as those in the arms and legs, can recover and regrow, at least to some extent. But nerve cells in the central nervous system — the brain and spinal cord — can’t recover at all. Continue Reading »

Spinal injury and ‘biorobotic control’ of the bladder

Published: February 16, 2016 | Category: News

bladder-control-credit-the-districtThere are many challenges facing people with spinal cord injury – and walking again is often the least of their problems. Cambridge research could help patients take control of their lives once more.

Spinal cord injury is, in many respects, a testosterone disease, says Professor James Fawcett.

What he means by this is that four out of five spinal cord injuries happen to men, and the most common age group is early adulthood. “Men are not good at assessing risk at that age,” he says. “Females are much more sensible.” Continue Reading »

One Small Step

Published: January 25, 2016 | Category: News | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

Darek FidykaA paraplegic undergoes pioneering surgery.

When a spinal cord is damaged, location is destiny: the higher the injury, the more severe the effects. The spine has thirty-three vertebrae, which are divided into five regions—the coccygeal, the sacral, the lumbar, the thoracic, and the cervical. The nerve-rich cord traverses nearly the entire length of the spine. The nerves at the bottom of the cord are well buried, and sometimes you can walk away from damage to these areas. In between are insults to the long middle region of the spine, which begins at the shoulders and ends at the midriff. Continue Reading »

Groundbreaking device being tested by VA may put end to pressure ulcers

Published: March 19, 2015 | Category: News

GRC_VA_multisensing-device-projectHelps detect the earliest signs of ulcer formation

Pressure ulcers (commonly known as bed sores) are one of the most troublesome and painful complications for patients during a long hospital stay, but a joint project between the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Center for Innovation and General Electric (GE) Global Research may one day make pressure ulcers a thing of the past.

A multi-disciplinary team of scientists have combined an array of sensing and analytical tools, including motion analysis, thermal profiling, image classification/segmentation, 3-D object reconstruction and vapor detection into a single medical sensing handheld probe to assess and monitor the progression of bed sores or pressure ulcers. Continue Reading »