Sunday, April 20th 2014

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Articles Tagged: Medical Research

Science sees future beyond Paralympics

Published: March 5, 2014 | Category: News

mens 200 metre at 2008 Beijing Paralympic GamesPARIS – Imagine a future with no sporting events for paralysed people. A future in which there is no need, as all the would-be competitors will have been cured.

This scenario, laughable just a few decades ago, is no longer far-fetched, experts say.

Bit by bit, important progress is being made in understanding and tackling aspects of paralysis. Continue Reading »

U.S. team conducts study using new cell technique in monkeys

Published: January 30, 2014 | Category: News

A research team at Harvard University has conducted a preliminary study on monkeys paralyzed by spinal cord injuries using a newly found technique for turning specialized cells into multipurpose ones that behave like embryonic stem cells, one of the team members said Thursday.

The same team is also experimenting with human cells in the hope of generating so-called STAP cells, which can turn into any type of body tissue, according to Charles Vacanti, a Harvard professor who co-authored papers on STAP cells published in the journal Nature on Wednesday. Continue Reading »

Drug may reduce chronic pain for spinal cord injuries

Published: October 29, 2013 | Category: News

West Lafayette, Indiana – Researchers have discovered that a known neurotoxin may cause chronic pain in people who suffer from paralysis, and a drug that has been shown to remove the toxin might be used to treat the pain.

The toxin, called acrolein, is produced in the body after nerve cells are injured, triggering a cascade of biochemical events thought to worsen the injury’s severity. Continue Reading »

Spinal Injury Cures: Balancing Hope And Expectation

Published: April 19, 2013 | Category: News

Disability: learning to live with realistic hopes.Reports of paralysed animals walking again can give unrealistic hopes to people with spinal injuries. What is more important is that they develop the skills and perspective to get on with their lives

A recent breakthrough in regenerative medicine saw paraplegic dogs regaining some function in their back legs: inevitably, the headlines talked of hope for human patients with spinal cord injury.

But the head of clinical psychology at the National Spinal Injuries Centre, Professor Paul Kennedy, argues that this kind of “magic bullet” reporting can be damaging to people who are coming to terms with a life-changing injury. Continue Reading »

Acorda Acquires Medtronic Drug, Fills Out Mid-Stage Neurology Pipeline

Published: July 1, 2011 | Category: News

Today Hawthorne, NY-based Acorda Therapeutics (NASDAQ: ACOR) announced that it licensed an experimental compound to treat spinal cord injury from medical-device giant Medtronic (NYSE: MDT). Acorda paid $3 million up front for worldwide rights to the compound, and pledged up to $32 million in regulatory and development milestone payments to Medtronic, which is based in Minneapolis. Medtronic will also receive a “single digit” percentage royalty if the product is commercialized, Acorda says. Continue Reading »

Extensive Natural Recovery Seen After Spinal Cord Injury

Published: November 14, 2010 | Category: News

Newswise — A study led by researchers in the Department of Neurosciences at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine shows unexpected and extensive natural recovery after spinal cord injury in primates. The findings, to be published November 14 in the advance online edition of Nature Neuroscience, may one day lead to the development of new treatments for patients with spinal cord injuries.

While regeneration after severe brain and spinal cord injury is limited, milder injuries are often followed by good functional recovery. Continue Reading »

Just the beginning: Embryonic stem cells used on first patient

Published: November 13, 2010 | Category: News

For the first time, surgeons have injected a spinal cord injury patient with human embryonic stem cells in a federally approved experiment, a biomedical firm said Oct. 11.

Food and Drug Administration officials approved the start of the privately funded safety trial in July, allowing a long-awaited test of the cells, which were grown from a single embryo to resemble forerunners to spinal cells. The unnamed patient received the cells at the Shepherd Center, an Atlanta hospital specializing in brain, spine and related ailments. Continue Reading »

Promise of stem cells fulfilled

Published: November 6, 2010 | Category: News

clinical trial in Atlanta, Georgia, is proof that informed public debate is the key to medical advance

IF I’m honest, my first reaction to recent reports that the first human embryonic stem cell trial had begun on spinal patients in Atlanta was one of nonchalance.

Not because of its potential significance to those of us with spinal injuries — desperate for any news of progress — but because of the stop-start nature of the trial, plagued as it has been by legislative and regulatory restraints. Continue Reading »

Human trial to use stem cells to treat spinal cord injury

Published: October 18, 2010 | Category: News

A patient paralysed through spinal cord injury has become the first person to receive human embryonic stem (ES) cell treatment in a clinical trial being conducted in the United States. The anonymous patient was injected with stem cells at the site of injury in the hope that the cells will repair the damaged nerve tissue to restore some movement. Continue Reading »

Appeals court grants stay in stem cell case

Published: September 10, 2010 | Category: News

The federal government will be allowed to keep funding stem cell research — for now.

An Aug. 23 ruling by a U.S. District Court judge barred federal funding of such research until an appeals court granted a stay Thursday that will allow the government to provide money until the case is heard before a federal appeals court, a process that could take several months.

U.S. District Judge Royce Lamberth cited the Dickey-Webber amendment, a federal law that prohibits the use of federal funding for any research in which human embryos may be destroyed.

National Institutes of Health Director Francis S. Collins said in a statement after the initial ruling that the freezing of federal funding greatly threatens current research. Continue Reading »