Saturday, July 4th 2015

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Articles Tagged: Spinal Cord Injury

Pain, paralysis “just life” for Surrey man

Published: June 26, 2015 | Category: News

Dan Thomas will take part in the Scotiabank Charity ChallengeIt wasn’t that long ago that Dan Thomas thought he had it all.

After years of hard work – he bought his first dump truck at 18, and had worked in the truck and excavating industry for nearly 30 years – the Newton resident, then 45, had a wife, a business and a house he’d paid off.

Then, in 2002 while driving home along 32 Avenue late one winter night, Thomas hit a patch of black ice, and rolled his truck into a tree.

His injuries – which he says included crushed lungs and two vertebrae in his back “basically disintegrating” – left him paralyzed from the waist down. Continue Reading »

How to Play Blues Harmonica after a High Level Spinal Cord Injury

Published: June 10, 2015 | Category: Information

playing the harmonica hands-freeA few years ago Jeremy Olson discovered something that could dramatically improve the quality of life of many people.

We already know that the harmonica is one of the most versatile, easy to play and affordable instruments out there. But what makes the harmonica special is that it is the perfect instrument if you have sustained a high level spinal cord injury.

This is because the harmonica is one of the few instruments that can be played hands-free. Continue Reading »

Spinal Cord Injuries Drop Among Young, But Rise Among Older Americans

Published: June 9, 2015 | Category: Featured Information

spine_59098Falls are the major cause among the elderly, researchers say

While the overall rate of traumatic spinal cord injuries was stable from 1993 to 2012, an increasing number of older Americans have experienced this injury, a new study finds.

“Spinal cord injury is a catastrophic injury that often results in permanent disability,” said lead researcher Dr. Nitin Jain, an associate professor of physical medicine and rehabilitation at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine in Nashville, Tenn. Continue Reading »

Post-Traumatic Syringomyelia

Published: April 21, 2015 | Category: Information

Syringomyelia is an uncommon but disabling complication of SCI. Although more than half of all people with SCI develop a cyst in the spinal cord at the injury site, only about 4% develop syringomyelia, in which the cyst fills with fluid and expands. This enlarged cyst, or syrinx, can damage the spinal cord and cause pain, loss of sensation, or weakness. Other symptoms may include low blood pressure with light-headedness, sweating, increased or decreased spasms, and impaired bladder emptying. In some cases, syringomyelia results in major loss of function. Continue Reading »

Upper Limb Kinematics After Cervical Spinal Cord Injury: A Review

Published: January 30, 2015 | Category: Information

Although a number of upper limb kinematic studies have been conducted, no review actually addresses the key-features of open-chain upper limb movements after cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). The aim of this literature review is to provide a clear understanding of motor control and kinematic changes during open-chain upper limb reaching, reach-to-grasp, overhead movements, and fast elbow flexion movements after tetraplegia. Continue Reading »

UnderstandSCI.com

Published: September 4, 2014 | Category: Links
UnderstandSCI.com

UnderstandSCI.com

This website is designed to provide information about spinal cord injury to patients and their families.

National Spinal Cord Injury Awareness Month 2014

Published: September 2, 2014 | Category: Featured News

September is National Spinal Cord Injury Awareness MonthU.S. Senate Resolution 533 designates September 2014 as National Spinal Cord Injury Awareness Month.

“…every 48 minutes a person will become paralyzed, underscoring the urgent need to develop new neuroprotection, pharmacological, and regeneration treatments to reduce, prevent, and reverse paralysis…”

U.S. Senate Recognizes September As “National Spinal Cord Injury Awareness Month” – Designation Builds Support for The Miami Project to Cure Paralysis… Continue Reading »

Spinal cord injury: as many as 500,000 people suffer each year

Published: December 2, 2013 | Category: Information

As many as 500,000 people suffer a spinal cord injury each year. People with spinal cord injuries are 2 to 5 times more likely to die prematurely, with worse survival rates in low- and middle-income countries. The new WHO report, “International perspectives on spinal cord injuries”, summarizes the best available evidence on the causes, prevention, care and lived experience of people with spinal cord injury. Continue Reading »

Trap shooting offers ‘great therapy’ for veterans with spinal cord injuries

Published: July 29, 2013 | Category: News

veterans with spinal cord injuries Shooting Range in High RidgeU.S. Navy veteran Jim Trombley, of Ballwin, clutched a firearm to his cheek, his eye riveted along the barrel. There was a long moment of anticipation, after which the command came. “Pull!”

A bright orange clay bird wheeled into the air, ahead of Trombley’s discerning gaze. A quick assessment of the clay’s trajectory signaled Trombley the precise moment to pull the trigger.

The shotgun’s report was immediately followed by the dramatic split of the clay bird, scattering orange splinters asunder. Continue Reading »

Technology, trends, and the future for people with spinal cord injury

Published: July 1, 2013 | Category: Information

Journal of Spinal Cord MedicineTechnology is one of the most powerful tools that can be provided to people with spinal cord injuries (SCI). It is widely accepted among user and clinical communities that wheelchairs can be tremendously empowering when properly selected, fitted, and the users are adequately trained. Unfortunately, wheelchair users are being negatively impacted by misguided changes in reimbursement for wheelchairs and associated technology resulting in them obtaining lower quality products. To make matters worse, newly injured people rarely receive sufficient training in wheelchair skills and maintenance, leading to premature wheelchair failure, injuries and down-time for users, and higher barriers to community participation. Conversely, new technologies show promise to increase the capabilities of people with SCI, but will trends change and make these technologies available and reimbursable? Science must push ahead and show the possibilities, while advocacy must drive policy to catch up. Continue Reading »