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Articles Tagged: Spinal Cord Injury Research

10 of the most significant advances in spinal injury repair

Published: April 7, 2017 | Category: Information | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

Until World War II, people with spinal cord injuries had few treatment or rehabilitation options. And even today, spinal cord injuries can have catastrophic effects on everything from mobility to sensation, bladder, bowel and sexual function.

However, over the past 20 years, several breakthroughs in spinal cord repair and technology have emerged. No single breakthrough has achieved a full repair, but each has advanced our understanding of the complexities of spinal cord injuries. Here are ten of the most important advances in spinal cord injury repair. Continue Reading »

New gene therapy hope for spinal injuries

Published: January 17, 2017 | Category: News

A new gene therapy that may restore some movement function to people with recent spinal cord injuries is the focus for spinal cord injury researcher, Jarred Griffin.

The new technique involves using gene therapy technology to insert genes into damaged spinal cord tissue to allow the motor neurons to potentially regrow and restore function.

It’s very early days in the development of the technology, says Jarred, (25) who is a doctoral student in the Centre for Brain Research at the University of Auckland, working with a team of researchers to pioneer the gene therapy. Continue Reading »

Improving Life for People With Spinal Cord Injuries

Published: December 7, 2016 | Category: News

“We are trying to improve someone’s quality of life. If someone can breathe without a ventilator, then you’ve increased their independence, and that, to me, is a huge success.” –Michael Lane, PhD

Walking is not the top priority for many patients who have suffered from cervical spinal cord injuries, according to Michael Lane, PhD, an assistant professor at Drexel University College of Medicine. Continue Reading »

Spinal cord rehabilitation and repair: an interview with Quentin Barraud

Published: November 15, 2016 | Category: Answers Videos

dr-quentin-barraudSpinal cord repair and rehabilitation is a difficult but important topic to research, can you please give a brief overview of research in this field?

There are many grades of spinal cord injuries, in terms of range of movement, from small disabilities to becoming wheelchair bound for the rest of your life, the range is very broad.

There are many different approaches to try to overcome these disabilities, with key areas of research being focussed on developing stem cell therapies and using growth factors to promote regrowth of the nerve tissue after the injury. Continue Reading »

Brain implants allow paralysed monkeys to walk

Published: November 9, 2016 | Category: Featured News Videos

Swiss researchers travel to China to conduct pioneering experiment.

For more than a decade, neuroscientist Grégoire Courtine has been flying every few months from his lab at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne to another lab in Beijing, China, where he conducts research on monkeys with the aim of treating spinal-cord injuries. Continue Reading »

Graphene Nanoribbons May Help Heal Damaged Spinal Cords

Published: September 20, 2016 | Category: News

graphene-nanoribbonsJames Tour, a chemist at Rice University, stated that a treatment procedure to heal damaged spinal cords by combining graphene nanoribbons produced with a process invented at Rice and a common polymer is expected to gain importance.

As stated in an issue of Nature from 2009, chemists at the Tour lab started their research work with the discovery of a chemical process to unravel graphene nanoribbons from the multiwalled carbon nanotubes, and have been working with graphene nanoribbons for almost 10 years now. Continue Reading »

Gene Behind Long Body Of Snake May Help Patients With Spinal Injuries

Published: August 9, 2016 | Category: News

snake-OCT4Snakes owe their long and slithery bodies to “junk DNA,” large chunks of the reptile’s genome that scientists once thought to be useless. The gene called Oct4 may eventually help treat people with spinal injuries.

Oct4 is responsible for regulating stem cells and affects the growth of the trunk in the middle part of a vertebrate’s body.

Study researcher Rita Aires, from Portugal’s Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciencia (IGC), explained that genes involved in the formation of the trunk have to stop their activities so that the genes that are involved in tail formation can begin their work. Continue Reading »

INSPIRE Laboratory

Published: July 12, 2016 | Category: Links

inspire-lab-orgOur lab mission is to INSPIRE (integrate sensorimotor plasticity and interventions to promote recovery) persons with neurologic injury to regain function.

We are an interdisciplinary team of engineers, physiologists, neuroscientists, and clinicians that share a common mission: to study plasticity-inducing therapies directed at enhancing sensorimotor recovery in persons with catastrophic injury to their brain and/or spinal cord.

Paralyzed Veterans of America Announces New Partnership With the Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation

Published: April 11, 2016 | Category: News

PVA-LogoParalyzed Veterans of America (Paralyzed Veterans) announced April 11, 2016, its new partnership with the Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation (Reeve Foundation). The organizations will work together to provide both veterans and non-veterans living with paralysis with the best and most current resources available that help educate and raise awareness of specialized care and needs.

“Paralyzed Veterans of America and the Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation are driven by a common cause: to make the world a better place for persons with spinal cord injury,” said Sherman Gillums, Jr., acting executive director of Paralyzed Veterans. Continue Reading »

New lab to help find spinal cord damage remedies

Published: March 12, 2016 | Category: News

Moving forward on paralysisA spinal cord injury can cause lifelong paralysis — no regular treatment is available, although a researcher at the University of Wyoming is working to find a solution with the help of a new laboratory.

Jared Bushman, assistant professor at the School of Pharmacy, came to UW in 2014 with a mission and a couple grants.

“I work on spinal care injuries and regeneration of peripheral nerves,” he explained.

With about $500,000 in grant funding from various agencies, including the Department of Defense, he has the ability to do his work, and now he has the facility. Continue Reading »