Monday, July 28th 2014

SUBSCRIBE: RSS Feed for Spinal Cord Injury Zone Email Updates Follow Spinal Cord Injury Zone on Twitter Spinal Cord Injury Zone on Facebook

Articles Tagged: Urinary Tract Infection

Non-UTI Problems Common with Urethral Catheters

Published: September 16, 2013 | Category: Information

A group of researchers would like to broaden urologists’ conception of common complications from indwelling urethral catheters to include more than urinary tract infections.

In a review of studies on mishaps stemming from these catheters, the team found among an array of non-infectious complications that leakage or incontinence occurs at a rate of 11% and that spinal cord injury patients have high rates of bladder stones and gross hematuria.

The investigators believe this signals the need for much more focus on preventing these events. Continue Reading »

Exercise may help prevent infection for paraplegic individuals

Published: September 18, 2012 | Category: News

medwireNews: Results from a pilot study suggest that a moderate amount of exercise may result in enhanced immunity in paraplegic athletes.

As individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) are known to be susceptible to recurrent infections, such as those of the respiratory tract, skin, and urinary tract, regular exercise may help minimize infection risks in this group of people, suggest the researchers. Continue Reading »

Neurogenic bladder overactivity improved with botulinum toxin A injections

Published: April 27, 2011 | Category: News

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) – Injections of onabotulinumtoxinA, better known as Botox, significantly reduce urinary incontinence due to neurogenic detrusor overactivity in patients with spinal cord injury or multiple sclerosis, a Canadian team reports.

There have been only a couple of randomized controlled trials of intravesical onabotulinumtoxinA injections in this setting, note Dr. Sender Herschorn, at the University of Toronto, Ontario, and colleagues in the June issue of the Journal of Urology. Continue Reading »

People with a Spinal Cord Injury Now Can Empty Their Urinary Leg Bag Without Assistance Using The PUMP™

Published: April 12, 2011 | Category: News

Emptying a leg bag without assistance is often a major obstacle for an individual a with spinal cord injury. The new power wheelchair accessory – The PUMP™ http://www.wheelchair-freedom.com/ – from BIOTX Ltd. allows people with a spinal cord injury to independently empty their leg bag into a toilet or urinal at a touch of a button. Designed primarily for urinary leg bag users with tetraplegia or quadriplegia, The PUMP will also benefit those who are paraplegic and have difficulties in emptying their urinary leg bag. In addition to freedom, The PUMP offers several health benefits to the leg bag user. Continue Reading »

UTI Risk in Spinal Injury Reduced by New Catheter

Published: November 2, 2010 | Category: News

The use of a hydrophilic-coated catheter called SpeediCath (Coloplast) delays the onset of urinary tract infections (UTIs) in patients with acute spinal cord injury.

Compared with the use of an uncoated polyvinyl chloride catheter, SpeediCath significantly delayed the time to first UTI in individuals with a recent spinal cord injury (SCI), study findings suggest. The daily risk of experiencing the first UTI was decreased by 50%. Use of the Speedicath hydrophilic coasted catheter reduced the number of UTIs per month by 21% in the acute care period. Continue Reading »

Robust Regeneration of Injured Nerves Achieved for First Time in Adult Mammalian Spinal Cord

Published: August 8, 2010 | Category: News

BOSTON, Aug. 8 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — Researchers for the first time have induced robust regeneration of nerve tissue connections in injured adult spinal cord sites that control voluntary movement. These findings provide hope that it may be possible to design therapies for paralysis and other impairments of motor function arising from spinal cord injury. Continue Reading »

Cranberry Concentrate Reduces Occurrence of Urinary Tract Infections in Spinal Cord Injury Patients

Published: October 23, 2009 | Category: Information

The results of a clinical study, recently published in the journal Spinal Cord, indicate that the use of Cran-Max(R) Cranberry Concentrate for people with spinal cord injury resulted in a significant reduction in both the incidence of urinary tract infection (UTI) and the number of subjects with a UTI over a 12-month period.  In the randomized, double-blind, cross-over trial, conducted at the Spinal Cord Injury Unit of the Veterans Administration Hospital in Boston, MA, 16 subjects had 21 UTIs while taking the placebo, compared to only six subjects who had seven UTIs while taking the Cran-Max cranberry concentrate. Continue Reading »

Magnesium efficacy in a rat spinal cord injury model Laboratory investigation

Published: April 14, 2009 | Category: Information

Object: Magnesium has been shown to have neuroprotective properties in short-term spinal cord injury (SCI) studies. The authors evaluated the efficacy of magnesium, methylprednisolone, and magnesium plus methylprednisolone in a rat SCI model.

Methods:
A moderate-to-severe SCI was produced at T9–10 in rats, which then received saline, magnesium, methylprednisolone, or magnesium plus methylprednisolone within 10 minutes of injury. Continue Reading »

A walking miracle: Swampscott’s Tom Smith overcame an injury that nearly put him in a wheelchair for life

Published: April 7, 2009 | Category: News

No one was sure if Tom Smith was going to be able to chase down the skater that had slipped away from the pack for a breakaway — least of all his own goalie.

According to Smith’s memory, he never made it.

His body tells a much different story.

Smith, a Swampscott native who was playing for the Northern New England team in Hockey Night in Boston’s summer tournament, has no recollection of advancing any further than the red line Continue Reading »

The stem-cell funding ban is a step backwards for Texas

Published: April 6, 2009 | Category: News

Why would Texas hamper its own universities, discouraging them from seeking cures for age-old diseases? Why would state leaders cut the state off from millions of dollars in research funding in the search for those cures? Why would Texas want to brand itself as a state where science and research are held in little regard? The answer, of course, is that it shouldn’t. But that is where Texas is heading if a provision in the Senate’s version of the state budget makes it into law.

The provision, inserted into the proposed budget by Senate Finance Chairman Steve Ogden, R-Bryan, would prohibit state funding of research on stem-cell embryos. The provision is a back-door method of legislating on an issue that deserves a vote on its own. Continue Reading »