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Articles Tagged: Ventilator

Diaphragm pacing in spinal cord injury successful in weaning patients from ventilators

Published: February 7, 2014 | Category: News

A new study published in the Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery finds that diaphragm pacing (DP) stimulation in spinal cord-injured patients is successful not only in weaning patients from mechanical ventilators but also in bridging patients to independent respiration, where they could breathe on their own without the aid of a ventilator or stimulation. Continue Reading »

Reconciling Life and Quadriplegia

Published: December 5, 2013 | Category: Featured Information | Spinal Cord Injury:

Reconciling Life and QuadriplegiaHealthcare providers tend to think paralyzed people have a very low quality of life. Actual spinal cord injury survivors tend to feel differently.

Earlier this month, a 32-year-old husband and father fell 16 feet from a tree while hunting, broke his neck and was left paralyzed from the neck down—making him quadriplegic—and reliant on a ventilator to breathe. According to the Indy Star, while he was still in the intensive care unit, in the early phases of his injury, his family told his health care providers that they didn’t think that he would want to live as a quadriplegic. According to the story, the doctors discontinued his sedation, and he awoke enough to verify that he did not wish to live as a quadriplegic. The doctors discontinued life sustaining measures and he died about five hours later, surrounded by his family and friends. Continue Reading »

Queen on wheels seeks next crown

Published: July 18, 2011 | Category: News

Jenni Taylor, 24, of Minnetonka, is the reigning Ms. Wheelchair Minnesota. A quadriplegic after a car accident, she speaks to kids with a message of not being afraid of people in wheelchairs.

Jenni Taylor isn’t supposed to be able to sit up without support, but there she is, exquisitely balanced on the edge of her bed.

She isn’t supposed to be able to breathe without her ventilator either, but a slip of her breathing tube once forced her to try contracting her throat muscles just enough to bring in some air until someone heard the alarm.

She isn’t supposed to be a quadriplegic, either. Who is? But accidents happen. Continue Reading »

Enzyme and graft combo restores lung function after spinal injury

Published: July 15, 2011 | Category: News

Until the last few decades, it was generally thought that damage to the spinal cord was permanent, as the nerves within our vertebrae stubbornly resist regrowing severed connections after injuries. But a number of studies have helped us understand why exactly it is that the nerves refuse to grow, raising the prospect that we could use this knowledge to intervene and help repair damage to the spine. In the latest indication that progress is being made in these efforts, researchers have used a combination of enzyme treatments and grafts to restore breathing activity in rats that had had their spinal connections completely severed. Continue Reading »

New hope for ventilator patients

Published: July 13, 2011 | Category: News

A new approach to nerve repair has restored breathing to rats with spinal cord injury.

Scientists believe the same technique could help human patients who have to rely on ventilators, leaving them vulnerable to dangerous infections.

“We’ve shown for the very first time that robust, long distance regeneration can restore function of the respiratory system fully,” said lead researcher Professor Jerry Silver, from Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, US.

The researchers used a section of peripheral nerve to “bridge” a break in the spinal cord which had paralysed half the diaphragm, the sheet-like muscle that enables breathing. Continue Reading »

The Site That Breathes

Published: January 15, 2011 | Category: Links | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

The Site That Breathes

“Life is not measured by the number breaths we take, but by the moments that take our breath away.” This quote has two meanings for me. The first meaning is exactly how it’s stated. The second is a literal and personal meaning. Life is not measured by the number breaths I take, which happens to be 18 breaths a minute, but by the moment that took my breath away. On November 1, 2002 I was in a car accident. I broke my neck at C1 C2 and injured my spinal cord. Continue Reading »

Promise of stem cells fulfilled

Published: November 6, 2010 | Category: News

clinical trial in Atlanta, Georgia, is proof that informed public debate is the key to medical advance

IF I’m honest, my first reaction to recent reports that the first human embryonic stem cell trial had begun on spinal patients in Atlanta was one of nonchalance.

Not because of its potential significance to those of us with spinal injuries — desperate for any news of progress — but because of the stop-start nature of the trial, plagued as it has been by legislative and regulatory restraints. Continue Reading »

New hope for spinal cord injury victims

Published: July 2, 2010 | Category: News

First breathing pacemaker comes to Israel.

The first breathing pacemaker of its kind that regulates the pace of respiration in victims of spinal cord damage has been implanted in Israel.

Yedidya Knopf, a 22-year-old resident of Jerusalem’s Alyn Rehabilitation Hospital who was seriously injured in a road accident nine years ago, was operated on a month ago at Hadassah University Medical Center in Jerusalem’s Ein Kerem. Continue Reading »

Paralyzed man ‘an inspiration’

Published: March 29, 2010 | Category: News

LINCOLN — Larry Schroetlin rarely came across problems he couldn’t solve.

He was an auto mechanic and loved to fix things. Townspeople depended on him and he always delivered, every time, even if it meant skipping lunch or Christmas dinner to change a friend’s tire.

He married his high school sweetheart, raised three sons and owned the only repair shop in Butte, Neb. He was an active man, piloting single-engine aircraft through the 1980s until it got too expensive. Continue Reading »

Eric Westacott Foundation Raises Over $30,000 to Help Young Quadriplegic Boy

Published: August 11, 2009 | Category: News

gI_DSC04350.JPGThe Eric Westacott Foundation has raised over $30,000 for physical therapy for 11-year old Alex Malarkey. The funds will allow young Alex to participate in two separate two-week programs at Kennedy Krieger Institute’s International Center for Spinal Cord Injury in Baltimore, Maryland, and to receive a Functional Electrical Stimulus (FES) bike and tilt-table donated by Lorraine Valentini and Chris Reyling.

The Eric Westacott Foundation (EWF), a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization dedicated to the study and cure of spinal cord injuries (SCI), announced today that it has raised over $30,000 to provide physical therapy for 11-year old Alex Malarkey. Continue Reading »