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Do acute SCI patients see better outcomes if undergoing surgery within 1st 4 hours?

Published: September 1, 2016 | Category: Answers | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

TCRM-108856-F02Researches in Germany studied whether time of surgery impacted neurological outcomes for patients with acute spinal cord injury, according to Journal of Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management.

Specifically, they analyzed 51 spinal cord injury patients, aged an average of 43.4 years. The patients had acute spinal fractures from C2 to L3 or nonosseous lesions. Continue Reading »

Looking beyond the wheels

Published: October 14, 2015 | Category: Featured News | Spinal Cord Injury: , , ,

As Robert Thompkins climbed to the top of Green Valley Falls in September 2005, he had no idea that in a few short moments he would never walk again.

He made the decision to jump off a cliff into the water below, never knowing how incredibly shallow it was. As he hit the rocks beneath the surface, he severed his spinal cord from the T12 to the L3 vertebrae. He was 25.

Such an accident can either destroy a person’s ability to see the beauty in life or reinforce it. The now 33-year-old Thompkins chose the latter. Continue Reading »

Bride-to-be perseveres to walk down aisle after spinal-cord injury

Published: August 22, 2013 | Category: News | Spinal Cord Injury: , ,

Alissa Boyle shows her wedding invitationJust like any other bride, Alissa Boyle finds herself immersed in

wedding plans leading up to her Sept. 7 exchange of vows with Nathan Grimes at Lisbon Trinity Friends Church.

And just like most brides, Boyle envisions walking down the aisle with her father, Jim, while her mother, Lori, and family and friends watch.

But Boyle’s preparation is unlike other brides. She spends hours in physical therapy and exercising at home to make that vision a reality. She was injured in an accident Feb. 20, 2012, that damaged her spinal cord. She and a friend had stopped to assist at a car accident but ended up being hurt themselves. Continue Reading »

Pharmacological Management of Hemodynamic Complications Following Spinal Cord Injury

Published: May 10, 2009 | Category: Information | Spinal Cord Injury: , ,

The damage from primary and secondary insults of spinal cord injury can result in various hemodynamic alterations. It is important to understand the presentation and time course of these changes, in addition to the management of each, to avoid further clinical deterioration and complications.

Traumatic spinal cord injury has an incidence of 10,000 cases per year with a prevalence of approximately 200,000 people in the United States.1 These numbers do not account for deaths in the field, which are estimated to occur in 16% to 30% of these cases. The patient demographics mirror that of the general trauma population with the average age around 30 years and a male predominance. Although motor vehicle collisions account for roughly half of all spinal cord injury cases, other events including assaults, falls, work-place injuries, and sporting accidents account for a large portion of the rest.2
Pathophysiology Continue Reading »

Miracle Michael will walk again

Published: August 16, 2008 | Category: News | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

wakemanDOCTORS feared Michael Wakeman would never walk again after he crashed a billy-cart into a car.

The 13-year-old had completely dislocated his spine, compressing a disc and squashing the nerves supplying the muscles to his legs, bladder, bowel and genitals.

Michael was riding the old cart down a road in Mount Colah in Sydney’s north six weeks ago when he hit a parked car and spun 180 degrees, slamming his back into the side of the car.

An ambulance helicopter transferred him to The Children’s Hospital at Westmead, where doctors found he was completely Paraplegic on his left side, and had just a flicker of movement on his right.

“When I looked at the scan I felt sick, it was so awful,” consultant neurosurgeon Brian Owler said. Continue Reading »